I’m going to go right into the slides. And all I’m going to try and prove to you with these slides is that I do just very straight stuff. And my ideas are — in my head, anyway — they’re very logical and relate to what’s going on and problem solving for clients. I either convince clients at the end that I solve their problems, or I really do solve their problems, because usually they seem to like it. Let me go right into the slides. Can you turn off the light? Down. I like to be in the dark. I don’t want you to see what I’m doing up here. (Laughter) Anyway, I did this house in Santa Monica, and it got a lot of notoriety. In fact, it appeared in a porno comic book, which is the slide on the right. (Laughter) This is in Venice. I just show it because I want you to know I’m concerned about context.

On the left-hand side, I had the context of those little houses, and I tried to build a building that fit into that context. When people take pictures of these buildings out of that context they look really weird, and my premise is that they make a lot more sense when they’re photographed or seen in that space. And then, once I deal with the context, I then try to make a place that’s comfortable and private and fairly serene, as I hope you’ll find that slide on the right. And then I did a law school for Loyola in downtown L.A.

I was concerned about making a place for the study of law. And we continue to work with this client. The building on the right at the top is now under construction. The garage on the right — the gray structure — will be torn down, finally, and several small classrooms will be placed along this avenue that we’ve created, this campus. And it all related to the clients and the students from the very first meeting saying they felt denied a place. They wanted a sense of place. And so the whole idea here was to create that kind of space in downtown, in a neighborhood that was difficult to fit into. And it was my theory, or my point of view, that one didn’t upstage the neighborhood — one made accommodations. I tried to be inclusive, to include the buildings in the neighborhood, whether they were buildings I liked or not. In the ’60s I started working with paper furniture and made a bunch of stuff that was very successful in Bloomingdale’s. We even made flooring, walls and everything, out of cardboard.

And the success of it threw me for a loop. I couldn’t deal with the success of furniture — I wasn’t secure enough as an architect — and so I closed it all up and made furniture that nobody would like. (Laughter) So, nobody would like this. And it was in this, preliminary to these pieces of furniture, that Ricky and I worked on furniture by the slice. And after we failed, I just kept failing. (Laughter) The piece on the left — and that ultimately led to the piece on the right — happened when the kid that was working on this took one of those long strings of stuff and folded it up to put it in the wastebasket. And I put a piece of tape around it, as you see there, and realized you could sit on it, and it had a lot of resilience and strength and so on. So, it was an accidental discovery. I got into fish. (Laughter) I mean, the story I tell is that I got mad at postmodernism — at po-mo — and said that fish were 500 million years earlier than man, and if you’re going to go back, we might as well go back to the beginning.

And so I started making these funny things. And they started to have a life of their own and got bigger — as the one glass at the Walker. And then, I sliced off the head and the tail and everything and tried to translate what I was learning about the form of the fish and the movement. And a lot of my architectural ideas that came from it — accidental, again — it was an intuitive kind of thing, and I just kept going with it, and made this proposal for a building, which was only a proposal. I did this building in Japan. I was taken out to dinner after the contract for this little restaurant was signed. And I love sake and Kobe and all that stuff. And after I got — I was really drunk — I was asked to do some sketches on napkins.

(Laughter) And I made some sketches on napkins — little boxes and Morandi-like things that I used to do. And the client said, “Why no fish?” And so I made a drawing with a fish, and I left Japan. Three weeks later, I received a complete set of drawings saying we’d won the competition. (Laughter) Now, it’s hard to do. It’s hard to translate a fish form, because they’re so beautiful — perfect — into a building or object like this. And Oldenburg, who I work with a little once in a while, told me I couldn’t do it, and so that made it even more exciting. But he was right — I couldn’t do the tail. I started to get the head OK, but the tail I couldn’t do. It was pretty hard. The thing on the right is a snake form, a ziggurat. And I put them together, and you walk between them. It was a dialog with the context again. Now, if you saw a picture of this as it was published in Architectural Record — they didn’t show the context, so you would think, “God, what a pushy guy this is.” But a friend of mine spent four hours wandering around here looking for this restaurant.

Couldn’t find it. So … (Laughter) As for craft and technology and all those things that you’ve all been talking about, I was thrown for a complete loop. This was built in six months. The way we sent drawings to Japan: we used the magic computer in Michigan that does carved models, and we used to make foam models, which that thing scanned. We made the drawings of the fish and the scales. And when I got there, everything was perfect — except the tail. So, I decided to cut off the head and the tail. And I made the object on the left for my show at the Walker. And it’s one of the nicest pieces I’ve ever made, I think. And then Jay Chiat, a friend and client, asked me to do his headquarters building in L.A. For reasons we don’t want to talk about, it got delayed. Toxic waste, I guess, is the key clue to that one. And so we built a temporary building — I’m getting good at temporary — and we put a conference room in that’s a fish. And, finally, Jay dragged me to my hometown, Toronto, Canada. And there is a story — it’s a real story — about my grandmother buying a carp on Thursday, bringing it home, putting it in the bathtub when I was a kid.

I played with it in the evening. When I went to sleep, the next day it wasn’t there. And the next night, we had gefilte fish. (Laughter) And so I set up this interior for Jay’s offices and I made a pedestal for a sculpture. And he didn’t buy a sculpture, so I made one. I went around Toronto and found a bathtub like my grandmother’s, and I put the fish in. It was a joke. (Laughter) I play with funny people like [Claes] Oldenburg. We’ve been friends for a long time. And we’ve started to work on things. A few years ago, we did a performance piece in Venice, Italy, called “Il Corso del Coltello” — the Swiss Army knife. And most of the imagery is — (Laughter) Claes’, but those two little boys are my sons, and they were Claes’ assistants in the play. He was the Swiss Army knife. He was a souvenir salesman who always wanted to be a painter, and I was Frankie P.

Toronto. P for Palladio. Dressed up like the AT&T building by Claes — (Laughter) with a fish hat. The highlight of the performance was at the end. This beautiful object, the Swiss Army knife, which I get credit for participating in. And I can tell you — it’s totally an Oldenburg. I had nothing to do with it. The only thing I did was, I made it possible for them to turn those blades so you could sail this thing in the canal, because I love sailing. (Laughter) We made it into a sailing craft. I’ve been known to mess with things like chain link fencing. I do it because it’s a curious thing in the culture, when things are made in such great quantities, absorbed in such great quantities, and there’s so much denial about them. People hate it. And I’m fascinated with that, which, like the paper furniture — it’s one of those materials.

And I’m always drawn to that. And so I did a lot of dirty things with chain link, which nobody will forgive me for. But Claes made homage to it in the Loyola Law School. And that chain link is really expensive. It’s in perspective and everything. And then we did a camp together for children with cancer. And you can see, we started making a building together. Of course, the milk can is his. But we were trying to collide our ideas, to put objects next to each other.

Like a Morandi — like the little bottles — composing them like a still life. And it seemed to work as a way to put he and I together. Then Jay Chiat asked me to do this building on this funny lot in Venice, and I started with this three-piece thing, and you entered in the middle. And Jay asked me what I was going to do with the piece in the middle. And he pushed that. And one day I had a — oh, well, the other way. I had the binoculars from Claes, and I put them there, and I could never get rid of them after that. Oldenburg made the binoculars incredible when he sent me the first model of the real proposal. It made my building look sick. And it was this interaction between that kind of, up-the-ante stuff that became pretty interesting. It led to the building on the left. And I still think the Time magazine picture will be of the binoculars, you know, leaving out the — what the hell.

I use a lot of metal in my work, and I have a hard time connecting with the craft. The whole thing about my house, the whole use of rough carpentry and everything, was the frustration with the crafts available. I said, “If I can’t get the craft that I want, I’ll use the craft I can get.” There were plenty of models for that, in Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns, and many artists who were making beautiful art and sculpture with junk materials. I went into the metal because it was a way of building a building that was a sculpture. And it was all of one material, and the metal could go on the roof as well as the walls. The metalworkers, for the most part, do ducts behind the ceilings and stuff.

I was given an opportunity to design an exhibit for the metalworkers’ unions of America and Canada in Washington, and I did it on the condition that they become my partners in the future and help me with all future metal buildings, etc. etc. And it’s working very well to have these people, these craftsmen, interested in it. I just tell the stories. It’s a way of connecting, at least, with some of those people that are so important to the realization of architecture. The metal continued into a building — Herman Miller, in Sacramento. And it’s just a complex of factory buildings. And Herman Miller has this philosophy of having a place — a people place.

I mean, it’s kind of a trite thing to say, but it is real that they wanted to have a central place where the cafeteria would be, where the people would come and where the people working would interact. So it’s out in the middle of nowhere, and you approach it. It’s copper and galvanize. I used the galvanize and copper in a very light gauge, so it would buckle. I spent a lot of time undoing Richard Meier’s aesthetic. Everybody’s trying to get the panels perfect, and I always try to get them sloppy and fuzzy. And they end up looking like stone. This is the central area. There’s a ramp. And that little dome in there is a building by Stanley Tigerman. Stanley was instrumental in my getting this job. And when I was awarded the contract I, at the very beginning, asked the client if they would let Stanley do a cameo piece with me. Because these were ideas that we were talking about, building things next to each other, making — it’s all about [a] metaphor for a city, maybe. And so Stanley did the little dome thing.

And we did it over the phone and by fax. He would send me a fax and show me something. He’d made a building with a dome and he had a little tower. I told him, “No, no, that’s too ongepotchket. I don’t want the tower.” So he came back with a simpler building, but he put some funny details on it, and he moved it closer to my building. And so I decided to put him in a depression. I put him in a hole and made a kind of a hole that he sits in. And so then he put two bridges — this all happened on the fax, going back and forth over a couple of weeks’ period.

And he put these two bridges with pink guardrails on it. And so then I put this big billboard behind it. And I call it, “David and Goliath.” And that’s my cafeteria. In Boston, we had that old building on the left. It was a very prominent building off the freeway, and we added a floor and cleaned it up and fixed it up and used the kind of — I thought — the language of the neighborhood, which had these cornices, projecting cornices.

Mine got a little exuberant, but I used lead copper, which is a beautiful material, and it turns green in 100 years. Instead of, like, copper in 10 or 15. We redid the side of the building and re-proportioned the windows so it sort of fit into the space. And it surprised both Boston and myself that we got it approved, because they have very strict kind of design guideline, and they wouldn’t normally think I would fit them. The detailing was very careful with the lead copper and making panels and fitting it tightly into the fabric of the existing building. In Barcelona, on Las Ramblas for some film festival, I did the Hollywood sign going and coming, made a building out of it, and they built it. I flew in one night and took this picture. But they made it a third smaller than my model without telling me.

And then more metal and some chain link in Santa Monica — a little shopping center. And this is a laser laboratory at the University of Iowa, in which the fish comes back as an abstraction in the back. It’s the support labs, which, by some coincidence, required no windows. And the shape fit perfectly. I just joined the points. In the curved part there’s all the mechanical equipment. That solid wall behind it is a pipe chase — a pipe canyon — and so it was an opportunity that I seized, because I didn’t have to have any protruding ducts or vents or things in this form.

It gave me an opportunity to make a sculpture out of it. This is a small house somewhere. They’ve been building it so long I don’t remember where it is. It’s in the West Valley. And we started with the stream and built the house along the stream — dammed it up to make a lake. These are the models. The reality, with the lake — the workmanship is pretty bad. And it reminded me why I play defensively in things like my house. When you have to do something really cheaply, it’s hard to get perfect corners and stuff. That big metal thing is a passage, and in it is — you go downstairs into the living room and then down into the bedroom, which is on the right. It’s kind of like a whole built town. I was asked to do a hospital for schizophrenic adolescents at Yale. I thought it was fitting for me to be doing that. This is a house next to a Philip Johnson house in Minnesota. The owners had a dilemma — they asked Philip to do it.

He was too busy. He didn’t recommend me, by the way. (Laughter) We ended up having to make it a sculpture, because the dilemma was, how do you build a building that doesn’t look like the language? Is it going to look like this beautiful estate is sub-divided? Etc. etc. You’ve got the idea. And so we finally ended up making it. These people are art collectors. And we finally made it so it appears very sculptural from the main house and all the windows are on the other side. And the building is very sculptural as you walk around it. It’s made of metal and the brown stuff is Fin-Ply — it’s that formed lumber from Finland. We used it at Loyola on the chapel, and it didn’t work. I keep trying to make it work. In this case we learned how to detail it.

In Cleveland, there’s Burnham Mall, on the left. It’s never been finished. Going out to the lake, you can see all those new buildings we built. And we had the opportunity to build a building on this site. There’s a railroad track. This is the city hall over here somewhere, and the courthouse. And the centerline of the mall goes out. Burnham had designed a railroad station that was never built, and so we followed. Sohio is on the axis here, and we followed the axis, and they’re two kind of goalposts. And this is our building, which is a corporate headquarters for an insurance company.

We collaborated with Oldenburg and put the newspaper on top, folded. The health club is fastened to the garage with a C-clamp, for Cleveland. (Laughter) You drive down. So it’s about a 10-story C-clamp. And all this stuff at the bottom is a museum, and an idea for a very fancy automobile entry. This owner has a pet peeve about bad automobile entries. And this would be a hotel. So, the centerline of this thing — we’d preserve it, and it would start to work with the scale of the new buildings by Pelli and Kohn Pederson Fox, etc., that are underway.

It’s hard to do high-rise. I feel much more comfortable down here. This is a piece of property in Brentwood. And a long time ago, about ’82 or something, after my house — I designed a house for myself that would be a village of several pavilions around a courtyard — and the owner of this lot worked for me and built that actual model on the left. And she came back, I guess wealthier or something — something happened — and asked me to design a house for her on this site. And following that basic idea of the village, we changed it as we got into it. I locked the house into the site by cutting the back end — here you see on the photographs of the site — slicing into it and putting all the bathrooms and dressing rooms like a retaining wall, creating a lower level zone for the master bedroom, which I designed like a kind of a barge, looking like a boat.

And that’s it, built. The dome was a request from the client. She wanted a dome somewhere in the house. She didn’t care where. When you sleep in this bedroom, I hope — I mean, I haven’t slept in it yet. I’ve offered to marry her so I could sleep there, but she said I didn’t have to do that. But when you’re in that room, you feel like you’re on a kind of barge on some kind of lake. And it’s very private. The landscape is being built around to create a private garden. And then up above there’s a garden on this side of the living room, and one on the other side. These aren’t focused very well. I don’t know how to do it from here. Focus the one on the right.

It’s up there. Left — it’s my right. Anyway, you enter into a garden with a beautiful grove of trees. That’s the living room. Servants’ quarters. A guest bedroom, which has this dome with marble on it. And then you enter into the living room and then so on. This is the bedroom. You come down from this level along the stairway, and you enter the bedroom here, going into the lake. And the bed is back in this space, with windows looking out onto the lake. These Stonehenge things were designed to give foreground and to create a greater depth in this shallow lot. The material is lead copper, like in the building in Boston. And so it was an intent to make this small piece of land — it’s 100 by 250 — into a kind of an estate by separating these areas and making the living room and dining room into this pavilion with a high space in it.

And this happened by accident that I got this right on axis with the dining room table. It looks like I got a Baldessari painting for free. But the idea is, the windows are all placed so you see pieces of the house outside. Eventually this will be screened — these trees will come up — and it will be very private. And you feel like you’re in your own kind of village. This is for Michael Eisner — Disney. We’re doing some work for him. And this is in Anaheim, California, and it’s a freeway building. You go under this bridge at about 65 miles an hour, and there’s another bridge here. And you’re through this room in a split second, and the building will sort of reflect that. On the backside, it’s much more humane — entrance, dining hall, etc. And then this thing here — I’m hoping as you drive by you’ll hear the picket fence effect of the sound hitting it. Kind of a fun thing to do.

I’m doing a building in Switzerland, Basel, which is an office building for a furniture company. And we struggled with the image. These are the early studies, but they have to sell furniture to normal people, so if I did the building and it was too fancy, then people might say, “Well, the furniture looks OK in his thing, but no, it ain’t going to look good in my normal building.” So we’ve made a kind of pragmatic slab in the second phase here, and we’ve taken the conference facilities and made a villa out of them so that the communal space is very sculptural and separate. And you’re looking at it from the offices and you create a kind of interaction between these pieces.

This is in Paris, along the Seine. Palais des Sports, the Gare de Lyon over here. The Minister of Finance — the guy that moved from the Louvre — goes in here. There’s a new library across the river. And back in here, in this already treed park, we’re doing a very dense building called the American Center, which has a theater, apartments, dance school, an art museum, restaurants and all kinds of — it’s a very dense program — bookstores, etc. In a very tight, small — this is the ground level. And the French have this extraordinary way of screwing things up by taking a beautiful site and cutting the corner off. They call it the plan coupe. And I struggled with that thing — how to get around the corner. These are the models for it. I showed you the other model, the one — this is the way I organized myself so I could make the drawing — so I understood the problem.

I was trying to get around this plan coupe — how do you do it? Apartments, etc. And these are the kind of study models we did. And the one on the left is pretty awful. You can see why I was ready to commit suicide when this one was built. But out of it came finally this resolution, where the elevator piece worked frontally to this, parallel to this street, and also parallel to here. And then this kind of twist, with this balcony and the skirt, kind of like a ballerina lifting her skirt to let you into the foyer. The restaurants here — the apartments and the theater, etc.

So it would all be built in stone, in French limestone, except for this metal piece. And it faces into a park. And the idea was to make this express the energy of this. On the side facing the street it’s much more normal, except I slipped a few mansards down, so that coming on the point, these housing units made a gesture to the corner.

And this will be some kind of high-tech billboard. If any of you guys have any ideas for it, please contact me. I don’t know what to do. Jay Chiat is a glutton for punishment, and he hired me to do a house for him in the Hamptons. And it’s got a fish. And I keep thinking, “This is going to be the last fish.” It’s like a drug addict. I say, “I’m not going to do it anymore — I don’t want to do it anymore — I’m not going to do it.” And then I do it. (Laughter) There it is. But it’s the living room. And this piece here is — I don’t know what it is. I just added it so that we’d have enough money in the budget so we could take something out.

(Applause) This is Euro Disney, and I’ve worked with all of the guys that presented to you earlier. We’ve had a lot of fun working together. I think I’m from Mars for them, and they are for me, but somehow we all manage to work together, and I think, productively. So far. This is a shopping thing. You come into the Magic Kingdom and the hotel that Tony Baxter’s group is doing out here.

And then this is a kind of a shopping mall, with a rodeo and restaurants. And another restaurant. What I did — because of the Paris skies being quite dull, I made a light grid that’s perpendicular to the train station, to the route of the train. It looks like it’s kind of been there, and then crashed all these simpler forms into it. The light grid will have a light, be lit up at night and give a kind of light ceiling. In Switzerland — Germany, actually — on the Rhine across from Basel, we did a furniture factory and a furniture museum. And I tried to — there’s a Nick Grimshaw building over here, there’s an Oldenburg sculpture over here — I tried to make a relationship urbanistically.

And I don’t gave good slides to show — it’s just been completed — but this piece here is this building, and these pieces here and here. And as you pass by it’s always part — you see it as all of these pieces accrue and become part of an overall neighborhood. It’s plaster and just zinc. And you wonder, if this is a museum, what it’s going to be like inside? If it’s going to be so busy and crazy that you wouldn’t show anything, and just wait. I’m so cunning and clever — I made it quiet and wonderful. But on the outside it does scream out at you a bit.

It’s actually basically three square rooms with a couple of skylights and stuff. And from the building in the back, you see it as an iceberg floating by in the hills. I know I’m over time. See, that skylight goes down and becomes that one. So it’s pretty quiet inside. This is the Disney Hall — the concert hall. It’s a complicated project. It has a chamber hall. It’s related to an existing Chandler Pavilion that was built with a lot of love and tears and caring. And it’s not a great building, but I approached it optimistically, that we would make a compositional relationship between us that would strengthen both of us. And the plan of this — it’s a concert hall. This is the foyer, which is kind of a garden structure. There’s commercial at the ground floor. These are offices, which, really, in the competition, we didn’t have to design. But finally, there’s a hotel there. These were the kind of relationships made to the Chandler, composing these elevations together and relating them to the buildings that existed — to MOCA, etc. The acoustician in the competition gave us criteria, which led to this compartmentalized scheme, which we found out after the competition would not work at all.

But everybody liked these forms and liked the space, and so that’s one of the problems of a competition. You have to then try and get that back in some way. And we studied many models. This was our original model. These were the three buildings that were the ideal — the Concertgebouw, Boston and Berlin. Everybody liked the surround. Actually, this is the smallest hall in size, and it has more seats than any of these because it has double balconies. Our client doesn’t want balconies, so — and when we met our new acoustician, he told us this was the right shape or this was the right shape. And we tried many shapes, trying to get the energy of the original design within an acoustical, acceptable format. We finally settled on a shape that was the proportion of the Concertgebouw with the sloping outside walls, which the acoustician said were crucial to this and later decided they weren’t, but now we have them. (Laughter) And our idea is to make the seating carriage very sculptural and out of wood and like a big boat sitting in this plaster room.

That’s the idea. And the corners would have skylights and these columns would be structural. And the nice thing about introducing columns is they give you a kind of sense of proscenium from wherever you sit, and create intimacy. Now, this is not a final design — these are just on the way to being — and so I wouldn’t take it literally, except the feeling of the space. We studied the acoustics with laser stuff, and they bounce them off this and see where it all works. But you get the sense of the hall in section.

Most halls come straight down into a proscenium. In this case we’re opening it back up and getting skylights in the four corners. And so it will be quite a different shape. (Laughter) The original building, because it was frog-like, fit nicely on the site and cranked itself well. When you get into a box, it’s harder to do it — and here we are, struggling with how to put the hotel in. And this is a teapot I designed for Alessi. I just stuck it on there. But this is how I do work. I do take pieces and bits and look at it and struggle with it and cut it away. And of course it’s not going to look like that, but it is the crazy way I tend to work. And then finally, in L.A. I was asked to do a sculpture at the foot of Interstate Bank Tower, the highest building in L.A. Larry Halprin is doing the stairs. And I was asked to do a fish, and so I did a snake. (Laughter) It’s a public space, and I made it kind of a garden structure, and you can go in it.

It’s a kiva, and Larry’s putting some water in there, and it works much better than a fish. In Barcelona I was asked to do a fish, and we’re working on that, at the foot of a Ritz-Carlton Tower being done by Skidmore, Owings and Merrill. And the Ritz-Carlton Tower is being designed with exposed steel, non-fire proof, much like those old gas tanks. And so we took the language of this exposed steel and used it, perverted it, into the form of the fish, and created a kind of a 19th-century contraption that looks like, that will sit — this is the beach and the harbor out in front, and this is really a shopping center with department stores. And we split these bridges. Originally, this was all solid with a hole in it. We cut them loose and made several bridges and created a kind of a foreground for this hotel.

We showed this to the hotel people the other day, and they were terrified and said that nobody would come to the Ritz-Carlton anymore, because of this fish. (Laughter) And finally, I just threw these in — Lou Danziger. I didn’t expect Lou Danziger to be here, but this is a building I did for him in 1964, I think. A little studio — and it’s sadly for sale. Time goes on. And this is my son working with me on a small fast-food thing. He designed the robot as the cashier, and the head moves, and I did the rest of it. And the food wasn’t as good as the stuff, and so it failed. It should have been the other way around — the food should have been good first. It didn’t work. Thank you very much..

As found on Youtube

[MUSIC PLAYING] MICHAEL HAYES: Architecture is not just about the need for shelter or the need for a functional building. In some ways it’s just what exceeds necessity that is architecture. And it’s the opening onto that excess that makes architecture fundamentally a human endeavor. Architecture is a technical answer to a question. It’s not technical at all, but rather is historical and social. The study of architecture is the study of human thought and human history.

[MUSIC PLAYING] This is about the architectural imagination. It’s how to think about architecture, but it’s also about architecture as a mode of thought. Architecture is one of the most complexly, negotiated, cultural practices there is. And a single instance involves all of the aesthetic, technological, economic, political issues of social production itself. And indeed in some ways, architecture, as we’ll see, helps articulate history itself. Now these are all big planes and will need big ideas to address these claims. It will also need very specific concrete examples of architectural projects and events from history. Welcome to the architectural imagination, an online introduction to the history and theory of architecture. I’m Michael Hayes, professor of architectural theory at the Graduate School of Design. And My colleagues and I will introduce you to some of the most fundamental themes, concepts, and examples of architectural thought..

As found on Youtube

20 Easy Interior Design Ideas for Small Apartments.

Small apartments deserve the respect that any other interior design project would warrant, but many individuals don’t know where to begin the process. There are many different ways to go about improving upon the interior of your small apartment, but only a few of them are going to feel “perfect”. Take it from someone who owns a small apartment themselves – there is a lot of stuff you can do!

#1. Drapes! When you add drapes to your rooms, make sure that they match the colors of the walls. This will allow a feeling of continuity to take place, letting the space feel larger. You should always be looking to match your color schemes, as it’s one of the more typical things to be considered in within interior design.

#2. Natural light. If you have windows, make sure you’re making ample use of the natural light present in your home. The more natural light you can see, the bigger things will appear. Natural light is also cheap, and doesn’t cost a thing! If you have the right windows in place, you can use as much natural light as you’d like. .

#3. Sofas and Armchairs – When it comes to your sofas and armchairs, you’d be better off with the raised variety. When they don’t touch the ground, it creates a bigger sense of space. The space underneath the furniture might not seem all too important right away, but once you see it all come together, it’s a wonderful feeling. The furniture that you implement within your small apartment is going to be responsible for a good chunk of how spacious your apartment feels.

#4. Clean your clutter! Clutter can be a big problem, especially when it comes to smaller apartments. When you keep things clean, the clutter won’t make you feel closed in. Clutter can be unhealthy in certain ways as well, so ridding your property of it quickly is a useful process.

#5. Neutral colors – When you’re looking into the palette portion, try and pick colors that are going to come off as being neutral. Your space will not only appear larger, but clean and well-lit as well! Beige, gray and tons of other colors could be deemed perfect.

#6. Fabrics/Rug selections – When you’re looking at these items, make sure that they are smaller prints; try and strive for plain/unified colors as well. When you can match colors correctly, a room will be much more appealing visually.

#7. Multi-functional furniture – This is a given, as anybody with a small living space will tell you that multi-functional is a big deal. When you can sleep on your bed, but also store hundreds of pieces of clothing underneath it, you’re going to be better off in regards to your space usage.

#8. Mirrors! Mirrors are a given, as they reflect the rest of your apartment and give it a larger feeling. This is important, as it’s a mind trick of sorts; when you have mirrors in your home, you can’t just stick hundreds of them up. You need to place them strategically, so that your entire apartment is benefiting from the light being reflected.

#9. Large pieces of furniture? They say that smaller pieces are always going to be your best bet, but larger pieces of furniture can actually turn out to be quite beneficial. When you implement a relatively large piece, it can co-operate with the rest of your apartment perfectly; giving it a spacious feeling. Test it out for yourself and see what kind of results you’ll be working with! #10. Small

#10. Small accessories – When it comes to the accessories you’ll have placed throughout your home, you’ll want to keep them smaller than usual. If you have a vase or table that’s incredibly large, it could take away from the space available in the apartment itself. Take a risk and work with small accessories, even if it’s something you’re not used to, you may fall in love with the results. Small scale accessories turn into larger than life interior designs.

#11. Group together your art pieces – if you have a lot of art to hang on your walls, try and group them together. When you keep them spaced out, you may feel like it’s allowing your home to appear larger, but it’s the opposite. You see a lot more of the wall, and if it isn’t matching in regards to color (alongside the rest of your drapes and other accessories), it’s going to cause problems.

#12. Mix and match patterns – Patterns, like squares and lines, can be your best friend. Much like a pair of striped pants will make your legs appear longer, striped accessories will allow your house to appear longer/larger as a whole. It’s a neat trick that many people implement with pillow cushions and such, and this is one opportunity you have in order to create a contrast of color.

#13 Foot traffic – When you live in a tiny space, there is bound to be an abundance of foot traffic somewhere throughout the house. If this is the case, try and identify these problem areas beforehand; this should allow you to prepare for the things that will go on. Create spaces for hanging out, eating and everything else; but also have a specific “high-traffic” area. Smaller apartments are much easier to destroy with a house party! Not that you’ll be having any, of course.

#14. Storage out in the open – Storage that is implemented alongside your typical furniture items (like a bed or couch) is always sought after, but open storage will be ideal as well. Have a few baskets that separate different types of items, and use them effectively; it will help keep your small interior organized at all times. This also has to do with the clutter portion of smaller apartments, and keeping yourself free from it.

#15. Picking proper “Staple Pieces” – Staple pieces are the ones that bring together most living rooms, like coffee tables or a sofa of some sort. Keep those pieces neutral in color, but introduce some variety with your accessories and accents. For example, have a light gray sofa, but use a few different shades of blue for the pillow cushions! It will not only feel comfortable, but spacious as well.

#16. Light fixtures – There are many unique light fixtures on the market that are appealing not only visually, but also emotionally (as weird as it sounds). There are some creative designs out there that could keep your small apartment lit up in style!

#17. Vertical storage – Since you’re already short on space, there are a few ways to get the most out of your small apartment.
When you make use of vertical storage, you’ll notice that there are tons of different places to have shelves built. Shelves can not only look nice, but they will allow you to store more items in your small space. Go vertical and you’ll never need to worry about having enough storage room to work with.

#18. Don’t block any lighting opportunities. – If there are ample opportunities for letting in natural light, make sure that you aren’t blocking any. If you have a bookshelf or anything that is an integral piece to your home, but it happens to be blocking a natural light opportunity, you’ll have to figure out a new place to put it. Light is always going to be the key component to making your home appear larger, as that’s the most ideal thing to be using it for. Blocking light opportunities could be compared to refusing a free shot at making your small apartment appear larger.

#19. Use some plants! Plants will not only bring some fresh air into the mix, but they will also just look appealing as well. Plants aren’t too large, and can add to the home-style atmosphere that so many small apartment owners are trying to achieve. It’s hard to create comfort in such a small space, but when you use plants and other proper accents, you’ll notice a huge difference. If you have a specific kind of plant/flower that you favor, you can work with that choice; there isn’t any specific kind of plant that will make your house appear bigger (just avoid large plants!).

#20. Kitchen cabinet knobs – Although this may seem out of context, the knobs that you’re sporting on your kitchen cabinets can play a big part in the spaciousness of your home. If it’s all one color, go with an alternative choice this time around – this is good for people who have landlords that despise renovations (or refuse to renovate properties on their own terms). Knobs are relatively easy to swap out, and if you’re under a lease, you can remove them and take them with you in case of a move.

Done, Before you leave, be sure to like this video and share it with your friends!..

[Narrator] It captures people’s imagination I think. [Narrator] First and foremost architecture does affect people in ways that maybe architects understand only after a building is built. People perceive architecture by simply being an object or a vessel. Within which people are housed. And that’s clearly not what our sense of architecture is. What the hell is an architect What does an architect do, you know? What is the difference between an architect and a builder? We concretize the world. We take human activities and make manifest the physical structures that accommodate all manner of human activity.

The design studio is a place where individual action and individual creativity is measured very directly but the people around them. The students are doing their job with shifting the focus of how we’re talking and thinking. About architecture. [Student] Before you come to architecture school you sort of have this idea about objects and things like that. And then once you get here it becomes all about space. Now all that occupation, people sort of see architecture like children, sort of sculpturely. And there’s a point at which you stop dealing with objects. You know, sort of things to stare at and start dealing with occupation. [Student] I have a lot of friends who find it hard to understand my schedule here and how we function here and being here on strange hours of the day. And working environment. And what studio space is like. [Student] And a way of working, too. [Student] Yeah. [Student] That’s really important. [Student] Yeah. [Student] But also the idea of being critiqued. I know what critique is. [Student] A foreign concept to a business student. [Student] Yeah. [Tom] The design studio is a place where students have to perform on their own.

They have to create something from their own imagination. They have to create something in response to a set of problems that are either given to them or they have to even invent the problem. [Student] There’s not a place where you can get this kind of culture. And we’ve been together for 5 years. The whole group, right? So, we know everybody. Everybody knows everything. It’s like a second home. It’s like a second community of people who are all struggling with the same questions. [Student] Now when I worked at home, it was so much lacking in the projects. There’s nobody to bounce things off of. The inspiration is at a minimum when you’re on your own. [Shigeru] Architectural education in the U.S. is one of the best because of the studio system. All the students hanging around with their own studio. Talking and learning from others.

That is the most important space for the education of architecture. [Student] It’s like having it. They were hitting on Robert Moses. Because he’s so insensitive and he tore down neighborhoods. This, that, and the other. It’s, you know what? Get in the car, drive on the Westside Highway. Take the Triborough into Manhattan. [Student] Ok. [Student] And then you will understand what he was trying to do.

That visual perception in the automobile. Spectacular! [Student] No, no. [Student] It is spectacular [Student} You’re thinking about it now because of the atom. Now, we sit in traffic and look at it. But back then, the city had to make that transformation. [Tom] The great thing about architecture schools is it’s still takes place… in a kind of space where people discuss the work, together. In both a personal way and a on-on-one way. And in a very public way. Ultimately there’s a kind of arena. There’s a public arena where the work is discussed. Where students can present themselves to personally to other people. And show that they have a stake in the work, and what they really think about the work and that’s extremely important, I think, to the development of an architectural project because that’s ultimately how… architecture at certain points has really developed in the real world. And it’s both an important lesson But it’s also a way in which you know, through that kind of intensely personal and human contact that… That the work gets better.

[Student] I do a lot of the culture of studio trappings at the most random times. So, like the most random hours. [laughing] [Student] I have to go through this. [Student] Think the humor adds another level of energy. [Student] So, you got moments where we’re all joking around. We’re doing the work, and we’re joking and we’re vibing [Student] and whatever. Some guys can be like “Well, that’s why you guys never get any work done” [Student] “because you’re always doing this shit.” [Student] [Beep] you! [Student] Go do your project. Live in your little world [Student] by yourself because the human brings the interaction. [Student] And then the interaction brings the energy and the energy [Student] creates an output between everybody. [Student] that we can all feed off of. [Student] Tomorrow morning. Don’t forget, please? [Students laughing and joking] [Student] Now bounce. [Student] Everyone’s hanging out. Smoking cigarettes and [Student] drinking a lot of coffee and not really necessarily [Student] at your desk drawing, or whatever.

[Student] Our teacher school is a really strange, specific [Student] environment. [Student] work into something. Like hours and hours on [Student] you know, 1 drawing, whatever and make it productive. [Student] You know, you could tell an architect that it’s [Student] due tomorrow and they’ll put in the 12 hours [Student] It might actually look the same, as if they spent [Student] a whole week on it. You know? [Student] I should have gone home earlier than I did. [Student] because I just like, every 5 minutes I’d take a [Student] bit of glue and put it somewhere. [Student] Becoming un-stopped. And figuring out what [Student] the hell it is that I just did. [Student] And start clear thinking. [Student] I have this terrible thing that happens to me. [Student] What I call the Design High. [Student] Where I can’t fall asleep because I can’t stop [Student] thinking about my project. [Student] But it’s like, I get home… [Student] the whole time I’m exhausted. [Student] This ease I like, brush my teeth, wash my face.

[Student] I’m gonna do bad. I need to get back to Studio. [Student] Your health is kind of put on hold [Student] to make room for your ideas. [Matthew] Architects are masochists in some ways. [Matthew] You’re in there ’till all hours of the night., [Matthew] You’re cutting yourself at 3 o’clock in the morning. [Matthew] Rush you to the hospital and get stitches [Matthew] Putting these models together that you’re tearing apart and then [Matthew] putting them together again. And you’re [Matthew] going for this iterative process of evaluation [Matthew] that is incredibly personal [Matthew] but yet also very public. And you’re constantly [Matthew] putting yourself on display. Opening yourself [Matthew] to attack and criticism. It’s intense. [Matthew] Why would you subject yourself to that and [Matthew] put yourself in that position if you didn’t love it. [Student] [BEEP] Ahh!!! God [Beep] [Instructor] That’s the conceptual mistake. The structured system [Instructor] does not simply fit with each unit. [Instructor] Usually the style of structure encompasses [Instructor] 3 or 4 units. [talking at the same time] [Student] I understand but I don’t see what that has to [Student] necessarily be the case.

[Instructor] It doesn’t. [talking at the same time] [Student] I understand that I don’t have to but I think [Student] it’s important for the resolution. [Instructor] It’s wrong, that’s why. [Student] Why is it wrong? [Student] Tell us why it’s wrong. [Instructor] Economically. [Student] Not the wrong way. [Instructor] Systems. [Student] You can take his whole project in terms of [Student] the economy of it. [Instructor] But you do it? [Student] Basically there’s [Student] these walls, like this. In terms of his diagram. [Instructor] Yeah, it’s supposed to have the other third [Instructor] with wall structure. [Student] They’re not completely [Student] ruined, so that the area’s in between…

[Instructor] It does not make anything. [Student] It wasn’t necessary to have that conversation. [Student] The point was made. And then that’s it. [Student] I understood the point. They understood my… [Student] I thought he understood my point. [Student] I thought that should be the end of it [Student] and there were more important things to talk [Student] about and other people that had to talk to him. [Student] You know? And still talking about it for 20 minutes [Student] Well, one thing that I always have an issue with [Student] is like, students get so frustrated if they don’t [Student] have a good critique. I think they misinterpret [Student] what a good critique is. I mean, by definition [Student] it’s a critique. It’s a criticism. [Student] So, if you go into a critique and all the critics, [Student] all they can do is blow hot air up your ass and tell [Student] you how great the project looks.

[Student] To me, that’s not a good critique. [Student] They didn’t criticize anything. [Student] To me a good criticism is if you can inspire [Student] enough thought based on what they see [Student] and what they hear. If it inspires enough thought [Student] then they will criticize. Not criticize [Student] in the sense of attacking. Criticize because [Student] whatever you showed them inspired [Student] enough thought that they had their own opinion [Student] about the thing now. That’s a criticism. [Instructor] I’m not gonna argue with you because I have a [Instructor] feeling it wouldn’t be productive. [Instructor] We can go on all night. [Student] We could. I know that’s [Student] not the point. [talking at the same time] [Instructor] We dare to find some resting spot, here. [Student] Where we’re not talking about the same thing. [Instructor] Allow us to help you. [Instructor] The other thing I think is sometimes negative [Kenneth] is the idea that the student should be trained [Kenneth] to do a sales pitch in this jury presence. [Kenneth] I think that first the student should be silent.

[Kenneth] And the jurors should start asking questions about [Kenneth] the drawings and try to understand the [Kenneth] project in a more Socratic way, you know? [Kenneth] Other than this sales pitch followed by criticism. [Instructor] If you’re a smart architecture student, you’re [Instructor] listening very closely because you’re not only [Instructor] interested in how that work is coming out of you [Instructor] but also how other people are seeing it. [Phil] The best architects, in my view, are the ones [Phil] who bring a coherent view of the world [Phil] to design. Those are the folks that become [Phil] the best architects in the sense that they’re the [Phil] ones that progress the profession, innovate, [Phil] create new ideas.

The most important thing about [Phil] being an architect is learning how to think clearly. [Phil] You have to be able to think clearly to [Phil] practice architecture. [Thom] You can, kind of see the same people as singular. [Thom] If your artistic, you’re not practical. You’re practical [Thom] and not artistic that’s totally preposterous. Architecture [Thom] is embedded in both worlds and if anything [Thom] architecture is the connect-a-tissue between [Thom] these two kind of spheres.

And it would be [Thom] impossible without one or the other. [Phil] One, we’d be practical and never produce a piece of [Phil] work of any interest. Yeah, you’d be producing [Phil] work that has no meaning. And no connectivity. [Joe] I think design require a certain kind of smartness. [Joe] It holds those schizophrenic views simultaneously. [Joe] In one’s thinking, even as a young person [Joe] you know whether you can do that. [Joe] and as you mature it’s quite rewarding to have [Joe] those imposing views in your mind at all times. [Terry] There’s not just one role for an architect. There’s [Terry] different kinds of contributions an architect [Terry] can make in the culture. The question of what’s a [Terry] good architect, I think that there are many different [Terry] perspectives that come at the project, [Terry] as it’s developing. And what’s important for the [Terry] architect is to be able to listen to people outside of [Terry] themselves.

And take that, and [Terry] then give something of yourself to a project and [Terry] make something incredibly unique and wonderful. [Terry] It has to be a person who’s really willing to learn in a way [Terry] that architects need to learn, which is they need to [Terry] learn something every day for the rest of their lives. [Terry] You’ve got to be, in a sense, kind of driven by [Terry] that inner force. But I think you always… [Terry] You also have to have the ability to work through [Terry] something and to be able to look at particular [Terry] and be able to listen and learn and examine with [Terry] great patience, some of those questions.

So again, [Terry] it’s kind of left brain, right brain kind of dichotomy that is constantly… Those demands are constantly placed [Terry] on you as an architect. [Maurice] The other disciplines bring other things to the table. [Maurice] But I think our ability to envision, or imagine [Maurice] something that is not there. [Maurice] It’s almost spooky to people. This notion that you can [Maurice] look at a site or look at a parking lot and see [Maurice] and see a building? It’s an extraordinary skill.

[Maurice] And we are one of the few disciplines that can [Maurice] do that. I would not trade for anything [Maurice] the skill-set that I learned in school. [Maurice] Because it’s very, very, very unique to our discipline. [Maurice] And that’s what we bring to the table. [Mary] I don’t believe schools of architecture, either historically [Mary] or today, have particularly prepared young architects [Mary] for the realities of architectural practice. [Mary] Referring to this notion of safe space, where one can [Mary] fail. Where one can push the envelope, in a sense. [Mary] I think the academy always needs to be that.

[Mary] In a certain sense, you’ll get freer of the constraints of the [Mary] real world. We need to understand that those constraints [Mary] also have to be brought into the academy, so that [Mary] students can begin dealing with it and dealing with it in [Mary] an inventive and creative way. [Mary] I think the academy should be a, kind of, idealized space. [Mary] But it also has to be a kind of laboratory, a testing [Mary] ground for the real world. And I don’t think we’re so good [Mary] with the ladder.

We are still that ivory tower. [Student] Sometimes I think we lose a little bit of the reality [Student] of what are job is. And what our profession is really about. [Student] I think people really forget the reality of what it’s [Student] gonna be like to be working as professionals. [Student] Architecture school is really… You need to because [Student] it’s probably the only time that many architecture [Student] students get to work on their own projects. [Student] After that, architecture is basically a service industry. [Student] I think that the profession is a lot different than the [Student] education, in that you never work alone. [Student] It’s hard to design an entire building by yourself. [Student] There’s other people that you have to network with. [Student] Or design with. Or consult. Collaboration is not usually present [Student] in school. Which is a good thing and a bad thing. [Student] Because during school you’re trying to develop your [Student] own sort of way of working. [Instructor] Very fast. And you only go, listen to what I say. [Dan] Education is not preparing them to be [Dan] some kind of architects in the full sense of [Dan] the word, architect.

Being both poets and practitioners. [Dan] They don’t want to be fooled. They’re talented, they’re smart. [Dan] The tragedy is that the students are not sufficiently [Dan] prepared to be independent thinkers. [Dan] If they have the function at the poetic level [Dan] or they function at the pragmatic level. [Dan] The two shall never meet. So we have to, kind of, [Dan] help them put those two together. [Student] Like a series of overlays where you’d start to see if [Student] there’s [inaudible] [Instructor] So the walls are retaining walls. [Inaudible conversation] [Instructor] If you give me a word right now, we can only [Instructor] respond to it. Let me ask you this. [Instructor] Why are they working just to put these things… [Student] They’re making things. Yeah. [Instructor] And they’re making things because they want to [Instructor] create something of value, right? [Student] Yes.

[Instructor] Why do the just want to [Instructor] put it in storage. [Student] Do I think I might not be an architect? Sure. [Student] The likelihood that I work in an office after I graduate [Student] is pretty high though. I don’t think people have to [Student] be stuck there for like 3 years and then [Student] get their license and then they do their own stuff. [Student] I’m gonna start doing my own stuff [Student] and work in an office. [Student] I look forward to… [Student] It’s hard to say what’s gonna happen. [Student] I’m excited to see what my signature ends up being. [Student] I wanna teach and I wanna write, and I wanna work [Student] for a friend that will let me do all these things.

[Student] I wanna get some experience in a larger firm. [Student] to see how they work and see how they operate. [Student] Do that and then hopefully the long term goal is to [Student] you know, start my own practice. [Mary] The remarkable thing to me is how optimistic [Mary] students of architecture are. [Mary] How they sustain that optimism. [Mary] Again, it’s almost a bit like an actor or actress [Mary] truths that they still cherish that belief that they’re [Mary] gonna break out of the chorus line in some way. [Mary] Even though the reality as it is on Broadway [Mary] is very, very different. In part it could be [Mary] how they very quickly imbibe this notion of the [Mary] store architect, and this belief that against all odds [Mary] that they might be able to make it.

[David] Fortunately a lot of people when they think of architecture [David] think of what storeitects. They think of where the [David] handful of brand name architects that they might have [David] heard of. Which to me is rather limiting. [Student] You only know Frank Gehry, you know? [Student] I mean there’s other architects out there that [Student] that are doing better work or work more important [Student] than getting… [Instructor] The problem is that the way we teach architecture [Instructor] right now is we sort of train everybody to do [Instructor] that exact same thing.

The whole sort of pedagogical [Instructor] model right now is around creating [Instructor] the next generation of star architects. [Instructor] That’s actually a flawed model. [Ted] For many years, everyone wanted to be [Ted] like Frank Gehry. They wanted to create [Ted] great sculptures in the landscape. [Ted] Whether those sculptures worked or not [Ted] is largely irrelevant. The ability to use [Ted] aerospace engineering to come up with forms that [Ted] hadn’t been built before. Was considered [Ted] to be a primary task of someone coming out of school. [Ted] That’s over. That’s over. [Evan] I would argue that this current generation of [Evan] beginning students of architecture [Evan] have the capacity to reshape the world [Evan] like we’ve never seen before. And they need to have access [Evan] to as much technology and as much discourse [Evan] meaningful discourse surrounding these techniques [Evan] and these tools. So that they’re fully prepared [Evan] to go out into the world in the future [Evan] to do something positive and productive. [Instructor] Students are coming out. They’re working with [Instructor] individuals around the world who need [Instructor] shelter and who need ways of living that are [Instructor] affordable and supportable and sustainable.

[Instructor] The students themselves have been pushing to force [Instructor] faculty to think differently. About the way faculty [Instructor] see the environment use the environment [Instructor] and create objects that serve, not just the [Instructor] esthetic interests of the architect. [Instructor] It’s fundamental an optimistic profession. [Maurice] You don’t go into architecture if your a pessimist. [Maurice] If you don’t actually believe that [Maurice] the world can get better. [Maurice] So, I think you got a bunch of optimists [Maurice] that go into this designer profession, they actually [Maurice] believe that their buildings are gonna make a difference [Maurice] in somebody’s life. [Student] I think that the best [Student] environment is something that people [Student] have appreciation for. [Student] If you don’t care about this, like what do you care about? [Student] It’s about understanding human behaviour.

[Student] Being a designer of human want. [Student] All the extra is what you experience in your daily life. [Student] On the street, the space of the street, [Student] how you navigate the street, how you relate [Student] to the buildings around you. [Instructor] People tend to think architecture is done [Instructor] for and by other people. [Instructor] But, it’s also done by you if you decide to [Instructor] put a new window in your house or [Instructor] change the traffic flow in your house or your office. [Student] At architecture school you got the freedom to… [Student] You don’t like something? Do something about it. [Student] That’s what they told you for 5 years. [Student] Do something about it. Doesn’t matter what. [Student] Just do something about it. [Instructor] This school is, kind of about a way of thinking [Instructor] And what you’re gonna do in architecture school is [Instructor] not what you think it’s gonna be, you know? [Instructor] They aren’t gonna go in there and [Instructor] you know, be designing [Instructor] a colonial home and things like that. [Student] We don’t just need shelter, we need atmosphere [Student] We live to be inspired. [Student] I think one of the most important things you can [Student] take from this school is not to lose your ambition.

[Student] It’s not just, you know, 4 walls and a roof. [Student] There’s more into it. There’s a life to it that… [Student] I think we get here and we should really take with us [Student] every way to go. [Student] If you’re gonna come to architecture school [Student] I hope you understand the creative process. [Student] I hope you understand the transformation that your [Student] mind and body an psyche is gonna go through. [Student] Because there is nothing absolute about this. [Student laughing] [both laughing] [Student] What do you think about that, Mr.

Zacoy? [Student] Yeah, making a movie, huh? [Student] Trying. [Student] Sure you are..

Looking for your dream home? Just press print. You know, I love 3D printing. I’ve talked about it a lot, in fact the second episode ever of Fw:Thinking was about 3D printing. And it was pretty thorough. But I’ve got to talk about it some more, so here’s a way to catch up. It’s also known as additive manufacturing, because a 3D printer builds an object by laying layer upon layer of material until it’s finished. It’s less wasteful than regular manufacturing because you don’t have to cut or carve away material to build your object. And in fact the automotive and airplane industries have been using this technology for years in order to develop prototypes in a cheap and easy way. But I’m still not thinking big enough! You see most of the 3D printers I’ve had experience with have been on the small side. The biggest one I ever saw was large enough to make a helmet that fit on my head. But when it comes to 3D printers, size is not a limiting factor. So what if you built a 3D printer large enough to print a house? Well if you did… you’re late to the party because someone has already done exactly that! And I’m not talking about a hypothetical prototype.

I’m talking a working 3D printer that uses recycled construction material and quick drying concrete as ink. A Chinese company called Winsun used four of these types of 3D printers to build ten houses in one day outside of Suzhou China. Now how big are these printers? Well how about 33 feet wide by 22 feet tall? And for our friends outside the United States, that’s 10 meters by meters. These printers are gargantuan! Now, these printers follow preprogrammed patterns, and those patterns are designed to create structurally sound houses, so that they can stand up to their own weight.

Now Winsun’s approach requires some work because they print the various pieces separately and then they have to put them together. Even so, with this approach they’re saving money with materials, with labor, with time. And these houses cost less than $5,000 a piece, so this approach could really be a boon for low income housing. Now you don’t have to go all the way to China to see this in action. We have a company here in the United States called Contour Crafting that does essentially the same thing. Now their 3D printer is mounted on a rail system, so it can roll up and down a construction site and build an entire house from floor to roof in one go. No assembly required. And Professor Behrokh Khoshnevis, who is a pioneer in this field says it would take just 24 hours to build a house this way! But this is just the beginning, and people are already talking about using this technology to build houses for people who have lost their homes in the wake of a natural disaster.

And maybe as this technology grows and evolves over time we’ll see it being used to build the dream houses of the future. So you won’t go to break ground on your new housing project, you’ll just make sure the toner’s not too low. OK, I’ve got a question for all of you this week. What do you think about 3D printing? Is it going to democratize manufacturing, or is spelling the doom and gloom of the consumer market? What’s your take on this technology? Let me know in the comments below. If you enjoyed this video make sure you hit that “like” button, share it with your friends. Join the cool kids, subscribe to the channel. And after you’re done with all that….this is just the tip of the iceberg – to learn about the really awesome future, check out these videos over here!

– Jonathan here, today we’re going to take a look at some of best available home tech thus far of 2017. So first up is the Philips Sonicare Flexcare Platinum Connected. A big shout out to Philips for not only transmitting this out, but also in the dark periods of adpocolypse for also sponsoring this episode. Now yes, this is a toothbrush on a tech canal, but that is because there is a crazy amount of tech packed inside this guy, starting with the fact that it will connect via bluetooth to your smart phone. So what’s cool with that bluetooth connectivity is the fact that it’s not just going to tell you to brush your teeth for “X” amount of minutes.

There is a smart sensor built within this that’s going to know how hard you brushed, whatever it is you brushing, and at the end of it when it’s all said and done which spots you reach accurately and which ones you didn’t. So that combined with the fact that it is steering you through your mouth area by area is kind of cool. I’m not going to lie, there are times when you wake up in the morning and you’re zoned out, you’re half-asleep, and maybe you brush the right side of your mouth course more than there is a requirement and inattention that left side, but with this not no more.

Now for those who’ve caught most recent videos, you know strokes per time is kind of a big deal. This guy is dishing out 31,000 strokes a time, and to breaking that down that’s 516 strokes two seconds and to visualize that, “one, two, three, ” that is 1,550 strokes that just happened. So you blend that kind of apoplexy strength with your adaptive clean brushing brain, which is soft, flexible, and merely kind of hugs your teeth, then you’re going to have some squeaky clean pearly whites. So next up is the Como Audio Solo wireless bluetooth, and specifically I’m taking a look at the one in walnut black. So if you adore lumber and you adore tech, you are going to adore this thing. Aesthetically, it is beautiful and if there were one word I would use to describe this it would be “classy.” Price-wise it is a little more than your median bluetooth speaker, but that is because it is more than your median bluetooth speaker.

For starters, build-quality-wise, it is using real lumber and not some cheap laminate, and when I say it is more than merely a bluetooth speaker, what I intend by that is beyond the bluetooth connectivity, there is built in radio, both FM and internet flavors, Wi-Fi, and then what stood out to me “the worlds largest” is built-in Spotify connect integration. Now, specifically for me, why I really like the Spotify connect feature is you’re actually getting better sound quality, that’s because you are drawing music immediately from the machine as to report to connecting through bluetooth. Then two, formerly you’re setup and ready to go, you can then utilize this stand-alone without needing to use your phone.

As far as sound-quality proceeds, this thing packs course, course more sound than you would ever expect for a box this size. It is clear, “its by” punchy, the issue is abundance of volume, on the other hand though it’s not going to blow your socks off low-end wise, so if that is something you’re in to you may potentially want to look elsewhere, but if you’re looking for something clear, that’s going to fill a chamber, is unique and packed full of features, this is your guy. Following that, maybe one of the coolest home tech gadgets of all time, especially for under $30, this is the Sideclick, and specifically I’m taking a look at the one for Apple TV, but if Apple is not your thing, there’s also one available for the Fire TV and ROKU. So, with the Sideclick, firstly and foremost what it’s going to do basically is house the Apple TV remote. What that’s going to do is add some size, add some volume, and in become hopefully reduce your chances of losing this thing. Now in my suit, the course I have it setup is the strength button is going to strength on and strength off the TV.

The plus minus will then control the volume on the soundbar. The up and down arrows will control the canals on the TV. The generator button will control the source of the TV. Then as far as A& B proceeds, right now I have an A to strength on the TV, that are actually only because I don’t have a secondary machine, but in theory you could have a Blu-ray player or a DVD player. Then lastly I have B powering on the soundbar. Now for me, the coolest thing about this guy aside from the rate, was how easy it was to set it up. It earnestly took less than 5 minutes, that’s because it connects through infrared, as opposed to entering in stupid codes.

Now the instance where you’re maybe also using a cablebox, this will surely improve things, but not be the ideal solution, but on the flip side if you’re someone who watches TV, devours their media through an apple TV, a ROKU, or a Fire TV, perhaps that is merely the answer you were looking for. So next up is the Nuimo smart home controller, which looks like it is straight out of the future. So far as magnitude proceeds, this right here is it. It is a super compact, truly sleek-looking machine, that also comes in lily-white. What it’s going to do is give you control over various tech products in your home, all through a single generator. Now as far as what this will control, right now you have Apple music, Googlecast, Lifx light bulbs, Philips Hue light bulbs, Ronfel, and then Sonos orators. Once you’re put together and connected, it is super is easy to switch between which machine you want to control, simply swipe up or down, then an icon will pop up on which machine is currently being controlled.

In this case, here with Philips Hue, you can see the lightbulb icon pop up, and as far as control proceeds, I can do something as simple as powering the light off or on, or something more complex light changing the coloring blue. Now hopping over to Apple music if I want to play a carol, simply press it,( upbeat music) volume, going to see next carol,( upbeat music) So you can see it tasks really well, it’s pretty instantaneous, and it’s going to give you that next degree control instead of having to reach out for your telephone or your tablet.

Now again the ideal location for this is going to be at the wall or a table or a table, not to be used free-handedly. But the good news is everything there is a requirement do that is going to come in the box. Now if I had any complaints “wouldve been” the fact that you do need an active bluetooth associate to use this whether it’s your telephone or your tablet, it will not work stand-alone. Beyond that I would definitely love to see more app substantiate, especially Spotify, but it’s actually nice if you use Sonos, “if youre using” Apple music, “if youre using” Lifx or Philips Hue. This is a really cool home-tech machine. So next up this would be perfect for best available tech, and if you boys been agitated for a new episode of that, make sure you drop a “like” down below. This is the Avantree bluetooth transmitter, which is going to allow you to use bluetooth headphones with your TV.

So what this tiny compact contraption does is connect to the audio of your TV and then creates a bluetooth associate that you can then connect up to two different bluetooth headphones. Now a couple tones, if you pick this up and you specify it up and you notice a little bit of slowdown or a little bit latency, that’s more than likely because your headphones do not support a low-latency mode, and if that’s the case they do make a complimentary pair of headphones that is designed specifically for this use.

On the contrary, though if you do want to use the low-latency pair of headphones, you can only flow audio to one pair of headphones and not two, so if you do want to stream audio to two separate sources, “youre supposed to” sacrifice the low-latency. You can strength this through the USB port on your TV, but what’s cool with this is there’s a built-in battery that could give you around 6 hours of battery life. That also establishes this perfect to take on the go. So if you’re someone who lives with others and maybe you watch things course too late or course too early, if you’re looking for a solution to continue to do that without disturbing others, this is a marvelous option, and again it is only $39.

Aside from that, thank you guys very much for watching. If you haven’t yet, shape sure you check out this video here where Philips partnered with TED to showcase how cool engineering like the Sonicare Flexcare Platinum Connected can help improve lives. This is Jonathan and I will catch you guys right now later ..

170417095826 studio symbiosis c1 crop tease super tease - These rising architectural stars could change India's skylines forever

(CNN)“India is the place to be,” said Amit Gupta, architect and co-founder of Indian design firm Studio Symbiosis.

And for the rising Indian architectural star, this certainly seems to be true.
Though the design firm — founded by Gupta and his wife, Britta Knobel Gupta — is only seven years old, it is already looking to shape cities and skylines throughout the South Asian nation.
 
 
 
Of the 40 projects Studio Symbiosis has signed to date, 38 are based in India. This not only includes lone-standing structures, such as hotels and offices, but several large-scale housing and city-planning projects.
For a practice like this one, they said, the scope is unique.
 

India: A booming architectural hub

The co-founders launched their vision in London, first studying together at the Architectural Association, then working with world-renowned architect Zaha Hadid.
They also have ties to Germany, where their firm’s international headquarters is located.
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But it is in India where these designers feel their projects really make an impact.
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“The architecture industry here is transforming,” Amit Gupta told CNN by phone from India.
“And the economic spike in recent years has really increased the demand for new buildings.”
Though established international firms have a strong presence in the Indian architecture industry, Gupta insists it’s time for young, fresh, creative new design houses like Symbiosis to make their mark.
“Yes, there are many international firms working out of India, but more and more Indian architects (are) coming back to the country and setting up base here,” he said. “There is increased building demand, the budgets are good, there is plenty of land. It’s great because there’s room for younger, smaller practices to move in with their bold new designs.”

A competitive edge

But designing innovative new projects in India is only the tip of the iceberg, Gupta said.
“The question quickly shifts from: OK, you can design it, but can you construct it?” he said. “And that’s where you have to be careful.”
Construction in India, he believes, is different from elsewhere in the world.
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“There is a combination of high and low technology processes and tools for construction here, and so you’re working with materials that (are) uncommon or rarely used in other countries,” he said. “It’s very rare in India, for example, to see buildings constructed with steel, but it’s very common to see buildings made from concrete.”
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Setting up shop in India, he said, has given him an edge over his overseas competitors to tackle these issues.
“Although we are newer and younger than other firms, we’ve been able to solve construction problems because we’re spending time in the country and seeing what’s happening on the ground,” he said. “We are able to see the state of Indian architecture up close.”

Tradition meets ‘cool’ new design

And Indian architecture — particularly traditional construction techniques — has served as inspiration for several of Studio Symbiosis’ bold, futuristic designs.
“We’ve spent a long time studying India’s architectural history,” Knobel Gupta said. “Mogul architecture, Wada architecture and of course the famed ancient stepwells. But we then take these historic designs and re-imagine them, and so you may not even recognize it at first because it’s done in a completely new form.”
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In 2016, India recorded its hottest days ever, with temperatures hitting 50 degrees Celsius (122 degrees Fahrenheit).
To deal with the Indian heat, the firm often incorporates water bodies — inspired by Mogul architecture — in its designs, as well as courtyards, which the partners say improve ventilation.
Knobel Gupta also points to a traditional South Asian technique known as jali, which involves creating perforated holes on walls or window screens to cool the space by compressing air.
“It’s a technique we find extremely interesting because it lets in light but does not let in heat,” she said.

Zero-energy design

Similar cooling techniques are seen in one of the firm’s newest projects: the Net Zero Affordable Housing Jhansi.
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“Electricity is a big problem here,” Gupta said. “It often cuts (off) several times a day, so these buildings are structured in a way that prevents overheating. The curvatures allow for an even distribution of wind for an enhanced cooling effect.”
 
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Painting with pollution

 

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The term “net zero” refers to buildings that use as much renewable energy as they can produce, aiming for a completely self-sufficient structure with almost no wasted energy.
To achieve this balance, rooftops at the Net Zero Affordable Housing Jhansi are fitted with photovoltaic cells that produce solar-powered energy.

The next step: Shaping future Indian design

 
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Is this the world’s craziest new skyscraper?

 

MUST WATCH

 
 
Studio Symbiosis has also been commissioned to work on several large-scale projects, with three major city-planning designs — Transganga Masterplan Kanpur, Allahabad Masterplan and Chola Masterplan — now in the works.
“City-planning projects are crucial to India,” Gupta said. “Aside from a few exceptions — such as Lucknow and Chandigarh — a lot of cities in India were not planned, and today we can see the repercussions of it.”
“Major cities in India seem to be horizontal rather than vertical, without a skyline and only a few major urban hubs,” Knobel Gupta added. “Of course, we can’t just do this overnight, but it’s something that we hope to work towards over time.”

Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2017/04/16/architecture/indian-architecture-firm-studio-symbiosis/index.html

Frank Lloyd Wright designed some of the world’smost celebrated buildings, but even they, in some cases, fall victim to the ravages of time, neglect, and disaster. Buffalo, New York’s Larkin Administration Building, one of the architects most renowned creations, was razed in 1950. The Rose Pauson House, an organic desert getaway in Phoenix, Arizona, burned down one year after Wright completed it in 1942.

But they’ve recently risen again. Not in drawings or photographs, but a series of hyperrealistic renderings painstakingly crafted by Spanish architect David Romero. 3D tools serve for precisely this reason—to be able to see that which does not exist, he says

Romeroused a powerful combination of Autocad, 3dsMax, Vray, PhotoShop and a long list of plug-ins to create the images.Hismodels nail the lighting, exude just enough depth, and displaythe perfect amount of rawness and texture—a welcome departure from thecustomary sheen in marketing visualizations. For research he combed Wright books and web sites, and collectedvaluable feedback from theFrank Lloyd Wright Building Conservancy and its onlineforums.

The results lookexquisite. Romero’sversion of Larkins 5-story, red-brick and pink-mortar facade jumps out at you in three dimensions, its strong lines, layered masses, and intricate friezes standing in modern contrast to theold-fashionedautomobile and cobblestone streets below it. Inside, natural light floods through its blond, glass-topped atrium. Its impossible not to marvelat Wrights geometric furniture, light fixtures, and detailing.

 

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David Romero

Pauson, in contrast, is the ultimate embodiment of its desert surroundings. Its low-lying field stone and plank wood walls seem to grow from the desert itself; its large vertical windows frame views of the rock-litteredmountains all around. The same materials existinside, where the space feels light, airy, and modern, yet also vaguely cave-like and prehistoric.

Romero also produced a rendering ofWrights unbuilt, spaceship-esque Trinity Chapel in Norman, Oklahoma, and hes working on designsof Wrights abandoned Ocotillo Desert Camp in Scottsdale, Arizona. If he can find enough time away from work as a renderer for a Spanish engineering company, hed like to recreatethe lost workof other Modern architects, like Alvar Aalto, Le Corbusier, and Mies van der Rohe, along with ancient monuments like the temples of Mesopotamia.

Romero says his maingoals are to draw attention to the thousands of exceptional buildings—new and old—under threat today, and to inspire others to reconstruct the past with modern tools. I find it curious that, even with the number of people who today work professionally in the world of architectural visualization, there are very few initiatives like mine, Romero says. Whats missing, he says, is funding.

One such effort, a competition last year called Project Soane, encouraged designersto digitally recreate Sir John Soanes Bank of England, a 19th Century Neoclassical wonder demolishedin the 1920s. (Historians have called its destructionthe greatest architectural crime of the 20th Century.) The contest, conceived by Graham Wyatt, a partner at Robert A.M. Stern Architects, attracted more than 80 submissions, many creating stunningly realistic depictions of the building, with itstemple-likedetailing and soaring glass rotunda. Techgiants like HP and Nvidia sponsored. Perhaps there is enough interest—from designers and financial backers, alike—to revive buildings from all over the world.

Read more: https://www.wired.com/2017/03/beautiful-renderings-resurrect-frank-lloyd-wrights-demolished-buildings/

150508152454 10 things singapore does best 09 super 169 - The rise of the urban jungle

(CNN)What do an avenue of grand oaks, a community park and a rooftop vegetable patch have in common?

They can all form part of a city’s “urban forest”, which numerous studies over the past decade have concluded make people happier.
And that’s not their only job: urban forests protect our cities from extreme weather, climate change and water scarcity.
 
 
 
But with more than 70% of people expected to have squeezed into cities by 2050, this green infrastructure is under threat, according to the UN’s Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO).
 
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Where does your food come from?

 

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“The cities of the future are going to have major problems in making sure that people live a decent life,” Simone Borelli, an urban forestry expert and co-author of a recent FAO report on global urban forestry guidelines, tells CNN.
 
“If you don’t maintain those forests there’s no clean water, and then there’s no food security. It’s a pretty simple equation but not many people think about it.”
Are we about to lose our urban forests?
 

A broad canopy

You may not associate big cities like Singapore, New York or Pariswith forestry but look closely: each has its own green canopy to varying degrees.
This “urban forest” is defined by the FAO as “the networks or systems comprising all woodlands, groups of trees, and individual trees located in urban and peri-urban areas” — it encompasses everything from grand parks down to a single tree.
And while there are no guidelines on exactly how much forestry a city needs, experts are very clear on its benefits.
“People think trees are dispensable and they’re not,” Stephen Sheppard, a professor in urban forestry at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Vancouver, Canada, tells CNN. “Green space is critical infrastructure.”
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He lists their advantages: urban forests can protect a city’s land and water supply, acting as natural infrastructure that protects soil and absorbs rainwater, thereby reducing runoff which causes erosion of soil and sedimentation in local water supplies.
“In Vancouver a few years ago, we had a million people without drinking water for almost a month because they had so much heavy rain and it whipped up the mud and the sediment in the reservoirs and it wasn’t safe to drink,” explains Sheppard.
Green areas also enhance and conserve biodiversity by providing a home for native animals and — when such areas are linked — by creating green corridors for wildlife to move around a city.
Brisbane City Council in Australia, for example, pledged last year to invest $90 million to establish and preserve wildlife corridors across the city to protect the region’s struggling koala population, which had fallen by about 80% between 1996 and 2014, according to a recent study by the University of Queensland.
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Tree coverage can also prevent landslides, mitigate the effects of flooding and protect from dust storms, Borelli adds.
And that’s not to mention climate change.
One of the biggest environmental challenges facing the modern world can be mitigated by urban forests: trees store carbon and moderate urban temperatures.
“With climate change, we know we are going to get three, four degrees increased temperatures minimum on average, which means a lot more heat waves,” says Sheppard.
“About the only low-cost way to deal with that is increasing and improving a healthy canopy of trees because they reduce temperatures and the urban heat island effect.”

The winners

So which cities are doing urban forests well?
Singapore is the world leader in terms of canopy cover, according to the TREEPEDIA project, run by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), in the US, which measures the level of trees and shrubs in cities using Google Street View data.
Despite its high population density of 7,797 people per square kilometer, MIT gave Singapore a “Green View Index” rating of 29.3%.
Sydney, in Australia, and Vancouver, in Canada, also do green cities well, both scoring a Green View Index of 25.9% — although with its density of just 400 people per square kilometer, Sydney has a distinct advantage compared to Vancouver’s 5,249 people per square kilometer.
 
“Singapore was very much like Hong Kong … about half a century ago. It was densely built-up, very cramped and with very few trees — but then they introduced a clear policy to make sure that the city will … become a garden city,” Jim Chi-yung, chair of geography at the University of Hong Kong and one of the world’s leading experts in urban forestry, tells CNN.
Although Hong Kong’s canopy hasn’t yet been ranked by MIT, the city’s residents have less than three meters of public open space per person in the built up areas, which Jim says is “probably the lowest record in the world for cities of a comparable size.”
“(Singapore’s tagline) the ‘Garden City of Asia’ was made a part of their marketing strategy in a way to attract investors,” adds Borelli. “If you have a pleasant environment, a green city, then people are more willing to invest.”
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Singapore is not the only green innovator.
“I think a good case in point is Seoul, in South Korea — they actually took out an entire motorway (in the city center) and put the river in there with trees and plants,” Borelli says, referring to the Cheonggyecheon Restoration Project.
“In Manila, they are establishing miniature parks wherever they can — crossroads, along the railway, old industrial areas — there’s a lot of urban space that is wasteland, so there are areas that can be converted.”

And the losers

Elsewhere, however, concrete is winning the battle against canopy coverage.
Despite its reputation as one of the world’s most beautiful cities, Paris — with a Green View Index of 8.8% — has the least canopy cover of the 17 countries assessed by MIT.
Hindered by its high population density — it packs 21,000 people into each of its square kilometers — the French capital faces similar problems to New York, which has the second-lowest Green View Index at 13.5% and 10,831 people living per square kilometer.
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According to Sheppard, part of the issue for established cities like these is historical, when Paris and New York were urbanizing climate change, for example, wasn’t an issue.
“There’s been a long, fine history of arboriculture and tree care and tree management in an urban setting, but now we have to deal with a lot of other complexities,” Sheppard tells CNN.
“Some is about managing existing tree stocks but some of it is about planning for the future. The green things shouldn’t be what’s just left over. It’s a vital part of the city and it’s at risk of being lost.”
Borelli says that older cities need to look for new, creative ways to get greener.
“For some cities, in a way, there’s not enough space left, so going vertical might be a solution,” Borelli says
Stefano Boeri’s “vertical forest” Milan, Italy, and rooftop gardens around the world, he says, are examples of good solutions in established cities.

Got a plan?

Failing to plan really is planning to fail when it comes to urban forestry, says Borelli.
“More and more we are trying to discuss a city’s forests with landscape architects and urban planners and one of the critical challenges is to make sure that urban forestry is included in the planning from the beginning, not as an afterthought.”
China, he says, has perhaps understood this better than anywhere.
It has recently invested heavily in green belts to restore the environment and protect water systems in existing towns, while new towns are being built around existing vegetation.
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“In China, they have a national forest city scheme and they now certify cities as national forest cities,” Borelli says, of the National Forest City program, which involved 170 cities and 12 provinces in 2015, according to the FAO report.
It’s had a remarkable impact, with tree cover in these urban communities increasing to 40% or more, up from less than 10 % coverage in 1981, according to the FAO.
But while China says it is hoping to grow “green minds” among its citizens, one of its other aims is monetary.
“The reason (China is) are doing that is really to attract business, to attract conferences, to attract tourists, to attract companies to come in,” Borelli says.

Costs may be the key

Forestry experts in general are upbeat about the growing realization among urban planners and governments about the need to increase greenery.
But Sheppard says, if cities don’t manage to achieve their greenery goals the health and environmental costs “are going to be huge”.
“Anything that looks like open space tends to want to be built on because it’s incredibly valuable per square foot or meter,” he says.
“And if you keep building and you don’t claw back some of that green space inside the cites from roads or future development sites then you are denying access to the things that make people happy and healthy.”

Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2017/04/05/asia/urban-forests-osm/index.html

170411180558 houston pool tease super tease - Glass-bottomed pool 500 feet above downtown Houston

(CNN)If spectacular heights give you that sinking feeling, then this is not the swimming pool for you.

A post shared by Market Square Tower (@marketsquaretower) on

The clip shows a brave soul slipping their bare feet along the pool’s eight-inch-thick plexiglass bottom, which sits out 10 feet from the side of Market Square Tower.
It’s being billed as the tallest pool in Texas and the only glass-bottomed pool in Houston.
 
 
 

A post shared by Market Square Tower (@marketsquaretower)

      on

    Viewers around the world are split between wanting to plunge right in or grab their towel and run.
     
    Anyone wanting to try it will have to befriend a resident though. The pool, which opened in October 2016, isn’t open to the public.

    A post shared by Market Square Tower (@marketsquaretower) on

    The building was designed by Houston’s Jackson & Ryan Architects and is the centerpiece of a wraparound rooftop terrace with views of the Houston skyline and Buffalo Bayou Park.
    For less gung-ho residents, there’s a second resort-style pool on a lower terrace. It’s not the only Houston pool to make a splash recently.
    The 1,000-room Marriott Marquis Houston, which opened in December 2016, has a Texas-shaped lazy river and an infinity pool on its rooftop, 110 feet above street level.
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    A lazy river in the shape of what?

     

    MUST WATCH

     
     
    And if you’re looking for apartment buildings with that added extra, you could always try Chongqing, China.
    170321115807 02 china monorail apartment restricted super 169 - Glass-bottomed pool 500 feet above downtown Houston
    The southeastern city has been getting creative with its housing and transport solutions to accommodate its 49 million residents.
    There’s a new 19-story apartment building which is not only close to the train station, but has a light-rail passenger train passing right through its middle.
    There’s even a transit stop inside, on the sixth through eighth floors.

    Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2017/04/11/travel/houston-glass-bottomed-pool-texas/index.html

    We are in a race. the race is against time. We have to build cities, we need them. But we have to make them in a different way. Dan Kammen says that we need a wave of innovation, not only for our way of life, but also for the planet. The consequences would be enormous if we lose this battle.
    I’m Thomas Goetz, executive editor at Wired Magazine. At wired, we look at the innovators and innovations that are changing our world. Here we will look at three stories from acclaimed filmmakers about the future of energy. We’ll explore cutting edge innovations in how we drive, how we live, and, in our first story, how we fuel our cars. They’re all ideas that promise to shape the path to the world of 2050.
    The world has close to a billion cars, and based on current growth we might double the number of cars on the planet by 2050. So if we double the number of vehicles, we really increase the amount of fuel they consume, and that’s going to have a big, big footprint in terms of our demand for resources to move all those vehicles around.

    Kay Keasling: We’re pulling up carbon that’s been stored underground and burning it in our automobiles and putting all that carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. If we don’t reduce that, we could have changes in the climate that we could never recover from. There’s a number of forecasts for what type of transportation economy we could move into. One vision is that we would use more and more liquid fuels, another one is we’ll use more and more electricity. Right now, more of the industrial activity is focused around liquid biofuels. The thing about a fuel is, its really unparalleled on a weight basis how much energy is in a gallon of fuel. And even if batteries develop as some of the advocates hope they develop, we’re not going to see batteries running large trucks and we’re certainly not going to see an electrified air flight.

    We’re going to need transportation fuels for those that will directly replace the petroleum based fuels that we’re using today. This has kicked off people looking at a whole range of other alternatives to petroleum in your tank. Isaias Macedo: Commercial production of ethanol as fuel started in Brazil in 1975. When we started the ethanol program, nobody talked about reducing emissions. This was not an issue at that time. First, and most important, we didn’t have money to buy oil anymore after the first oil short. We were importers of oil. And today, more than 50% of all cars use ethanol instead of gasoline. Brazil made a very conscious choice to try to find a way to reduce their fossil fuel dependence.

    And they didn’t have to look very far because Brazil’s climate is ideal for growing sugar cane. Carlos Dinucci: when you have sugar cane plantation, you have only two things to make: sugar and ethanol. My family has been in the sugarcane business since 1955 and about thirty years ago, I thought “there’s an opportunity to make more ethanol.” Now, we’re producing 120,000 cubic meters of ethanol. Brazil today has very close to 400 sugar mills. The overall sales is 30 billion us dollars. And this number is increasing. If you look at how they make ethanol and how efficient the process is, it’s really a model for all of us.

    They grind the plant up, extract the sugar from the cane, the sugar goes into these large fermentation tanks which combine sugars together with yeast that naturally produces ethanol. They use the rest of the plant to generate heat to distill the ethanol and turn it into fuel. They also use that heat to generate electricity renewably, not putting excess carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. Brazil has gotten to a point today where they’re using about 40% less petroleum than they would be otherwise, but Brazil cannot supply the whole world with ethanol because they would have to cut very strongly into food production and into critical natural areas like the Amazon to make that happen. This really boils down to the fact that there’s only so much arable land, and growing fuel for our gas tanks is yet another demand on that landscape. We cannot kid ourselves into thinking that we’ve found a general solution for the world problem. I think we have to face the world in this way today. We have no oil in very large quantities anymore. We have no coal transforming in a clean way, in the meantime we have to do the best we can, and the best at the moment is that we can do biofuels.

    Sugarcane to ethanol is an incredibly efficient process. You get out about seven times the energy you put into growing the sugar cane. In the US when we produce ethanol from corn, for every unit of input of energy we get about the same amount of energy out. So we’re really not gaining anything. We need a better process. We don’t have to take what nature’s given us, we can actually engineer plants and yeast to be more efficient. And that’s the basis for a lot of the work that we’re doing now. What we need to look at though, is which of the pathways to come out of this are not only good financially, but those that are also good for sustainability. And this equation is really wide open right now. We are in a race to develop fuels. The race isn’t with other countries, the race is against time. Cristiano Borges: To meet the immediate and future demands, we made the energy solution spring from the ground. Luis Scoffone: Brazil is the most efficient ethanol producing country in the world.

    Sugarcane alcohol from Brazil can reduce the total carbon footprint by up to 70%, compared with gasoline. The biggest challenge for fuel providers, and car manufacturers is to reduce CO2 emissions over the next twenty years. Demand for mobility will continue to grow. We believe that biofuels are very important because they help in an immediate way. All forms of fuel are going to be needed; hydrocarbons, natural gas, biofuels, all of them are going to be part of the energy needs for the future of transportation. Brazil has been very successful at taking a resource they had and finding the process to make that into ethanol and people call those first generation biofuels. We have lots of lab work around the world that are looking at the second generation and that’s generally turning cellulosic material from for example weeds, into biofuels.

    And the United States is very much at the forefront of the innovation part of the equation. For centuries we’ve been using yeast to consume glucose and produce wine and beer. We’re trying to do something very similar, only we’re engineering the yeast to consume that glucose and turn it into a fuel or drug or chemical. We call this synthetic biology and when i started in this area, many of my colleagues said “Oh Jay, this is great work, but where’s the application, what are you going to do with these tools?” Who cares? Malaria is an enormous problem. In any one year, a million or so people die of the disease and most of them are children under the age of 5.

    So we thought this was a great opportunity to engineer yeast to produce an antimalarial drug called artemisinin. This drug is derived from plants right now, but its too expensive for people in the developing world. So my laboratory engineered yeast to produce small quantities of artemisinin, now that process is being scaled up and we’ll have this drug on the market shortly, but at a substantially reduced cost. It turns out that that anti-malarial drug is a hydrocarbon and it’s very similar in many ways to diesel fuel. We thought, gosh we can turn our attention now to fuels. We can make a few changes in that microbe to turn it into a fuel-producing microbe. If we imagine that glucose is going to be our new petroleum, we need a source for that glucose.

    So the crops that we’re looking at are crops like switchgrass. This is a native grass, it grows without a lot of water and on marginal lands. we could turn it into energy farms. The challenge though, is that unlike sugar cane, it’s very difficult to get the sugar out of that biomass. So we use what we call a pre-treatment process to extract the glucose from the plant, and then we feed that glucose to a yeast that we’ve engineered to produce hydrocarbons.

    And that yeast takes in the sugar, and it changes its composition and gives us this high-energy molecule. They float to the top, you skim them off, you put them in your tank. But it takes a lot of work to get from that small test tube all the way up into the million-gallon tank, so we have to give it time. But I think that some of the discoveries that are happening might be applied by the end of the decade. In terms of a sustainable equation for the planet, the role of biofuels is quite tricky. There are a variety of crops that do not compete directly with food, and finding ways to utilize those types of crops first, that’s very attractive. So solving the science is part of the story, but then evaluating all of the new fuels in terms of the land-use impacts that they could have, that is an even harder story than doing the good science. Imagine that you could have one process that could take in sunlight and carbon dioxide and turn it into fuel. And imagine if that didn’t involve growing anything at all.

    Nate Lewis: The synthetic biologists are trying to take plants and make them do things that they wouldn’t normally do. On the other hand, materials chemists, like myself, want to do artificial photosynthesis to improve on the process that nature does in real photosynthesis. We should follow the blue print of plants converting sunlight into fuel, but take the approach that it could be much simpler. All we really need is a light absorber that absorbs sunlight. We also need a catalyst like iron or nickel. So when you see the hydrogen coming off of the photo-active material, that’s an example of a semi-conductor breaking the chemical bonds of water to make hydrogen and oxygen. Ultimately, our pieces are going to be contained in something that is easy to roll out like bubble wrap, where in would come sunlight and water. You would vent the oxygen to the air, but the bottom would wick out your liquid or gaseous fuel, that then you could collect and use for our cars and planes and storage. Our goal is within two years, to have the first artificial photosynthesis solarfuels generator that we can hold in our hands.

    And then, get to scale beyond that time. We’re certainly not good at predicting the future, but to me, electric vehicles look like a sustainable option. We’ve heard proposals about things as far-fetched as nuclear power planes, and even some proposals to move freight around with lighter-than-air vehicles. And so if the future in 2050 does include a fair amount of oil, what it means would be that we haven’t deployed as many of these clean technologies as we already know are possible. If you think about how long it’s taken for us to build up the petroleum industry, we can’t hope to reverse that overnight. It’s a huge change in our infrastructure. Yes, we should have been working on it 30 years ago. We didn’t. We’re trying to make up for that, and that means basic research needs to be done now and by as many people as possible. We have a long way to go, but I’m confident that we’ll get there. In the future, 3d maps are going to help people get places more efficiently. As we just saw, the race to produce cleaner energy is charging ahead.

    In the meantime, demand for cars continues to climb. By 2050, it’s predicted there will be two billion cars on the planet, and fuel consumption will have tripled. To keep pace, we’ll have to radically change the way we drive. Here’s our next story, ‘Driven by design.’ Asaaf Biderman: The automobile came around, in many ways it was the future. We thought of it as one of the more positive changes that had happened to society.

    Suddenly, our ability to get a job changed, we can live farther away with bigger plots of land, with better quality of living. It all looked quite good. But there are limitations to swearing by the car. If it gets congested, your quality of life drops immediately. You have to spend so long in the car. It’s a very inefficient use of fuel consumption. Things stop making sense all of a sudden. It doesn’t bring you closer to where you want to get, it actually, sometimes brings you farther. Narrator: The average American spends nearly 300 hours a year in their car. 38 of them stuck in traffic. Annually, congestion consumes over $1 billion in gasoline in the United States alone.

    The inefficiency caused by traffic, both financial and personal, is enormous. Dirk Sheehan and Carmen White’s story is not that unusual today. Carmen White: Dirk works an hour and a half away in Warrenville, Illinois. Generally he wouldn’t leave work until 6 or and I would say usual time for him to get home is around 8. You all done? Thanks, buddy. Dirk Sheehan: Usually when I wake up I’m the only one up. Sometimes the kids wake up with my routine. More often than not, I don’t see them in the morning. I think about my commute when I wake up. I check the traffic report to see if there’s any delays. The worst case scenario, it takes me two hours to get to work. We are already so limited in the amount of time he can spend with the kids, and our expenses are crazy high. We’re spending $400 a month on gas. It takes away from our food budget, and we never paid for gas like that before.

    Ever. If there’s technology that would allow me to spend less time in the car, spend less money on gas, and spend more time at home, I’d be all for that. Mike Finn: The cost of traffic is people’s time, it’s fuel wasted, it’s an emotional toll, it’s a frustration. Utilizing the roads more intelligently is a much more efficient approach to the inability to have supply keep up with traffic demand. John Leonard: If you took a satellite picture of the highway, you can see that there’s actually a lot of open space.

    If we had the technology for cars to drive more closely, but safely, then you could increase the utilization of the road network. What this means is that to be more efficient, to use less fuel, we need to see the road differently. We need cars that can navigate through the urban landscape in a radically different way. Cliff Fox: Maps in the future are going to be able to help people get places either more safely or more efficiently. Today, just helps you get from point A to point B. But, what if I want to get someplace and use the least amount of fuel possible? Or, if I’ve got a hybrid vehicle, and I want to make sure I’ve got plenty of charge to not only get there but to get back home? So, information that is gonna help people achieve the more efficient or the safer route is more detailed information about the road than a lot of people realize is possible to collect today.

    Here in Chicago, Nokia’s location & commerce unit is developing the next generation of mapping. Lidar, sonar, 360-degree video, all are components of what Nokia calls – digital mapping. We use 64 lasers that rotate and they collect data in a 3D way about the world. It creates what we call a point cloud of information. That point cloud allows us to measure distances then between the points that we collect. That system combined with the cameras, with higher precision location detection through inertial measurement units, that whole data system allows us to collect million points of data per second. Probably within 2-3 years, you’re gonna see 3D maps that are gonna integrate the traffic information into your routing, to help you understand. If I’ve got 5 different routes to take, which one is the most efficient today, given the way the stoplights are running, given the way traffic is running.

    All of those factors are gonna be taken into consideration to make sure I’ve got the best route. But better mapping that can integrate topography, infrastructure, and density is only part of the answer. Another key to improving transport efficiency is building cars that drive themselves. Autonomous vehicle technology has a tremendous potential to improve efficiency of our road infrastructure. By removing humans from the equation, we eliminate all the things we do wrong behind the wheel – speeding, changing lanes too often, merging haphazardly; and by marrying them with sophisticated 3D maps, we can make driving safer and more energy efficient. That next generation vehicle is being built right now by Swedish trucking company, Scania. Tony Sandberg: The solution, as we see it, is that the vehicles can utilize intelligent maps. 3D maps with traffic information.

    The vehicles will be intelligent and communicate with each other. They will talk to each other, they will talk to the infrastructure. And we will see autonomously-driven vehicles. The goal was to have multiple robots and see if they could go 60 miles fully autonomously. Helen Taylor: My name’s Helen Taylor. My husband John and I, we’re very passionate about fuel economy. John Taylor: Yea it’s great to break world records, but that’s not the be all and end all now. It’s more important to educate people. Together we’re showing drivers around the world simple techniques to improve their fuel efficiency.

    We run these education programs, get people on the road with us, and we finally tweak their driving techniques. Things like just checking your tire pressures before you even get into your car. For every one psi your tires are under inflated, you’re wasting 3% of your fuel efficiency. And the difference between 65 and 75 miles per hour is a saving of 23%. When you talk to the general public, they’re very surprised that an energy company, like Shell, is trying to educate people on how to save money, how to reduce CO2 emissions.

    And here we have Shell sending us around the world to do that. You always hope when you’re on this planet that you can make a real difference in people’s lives. When you get emails from people saying “I’ve saved this amount of money this year, now I can put food on the table”, then you know you are really making a difference. By displaying traffic density in the urban infrastructure in a revolutionary way, 3D digital maps will help create a more fuel-efficient future. But these technologies are limited by the drivers who sit behind the wheel. Some believe, that for cars and trucks to be truly energy-efficient, they will need to drive themselves. The technology’s coming into play, through sensors and capabilities for cars to drive autonomously. In 2007, the United States’ department of defense held a competition to see if a completely autonomous, self-driving vehicle was possible. DARPA stands for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.

    They had a competition to develop self-driving robots that could drive themselves in traffic. The goal was to have multiple robots, turn them loose on a course, and see if they could go sixty miles in six hours, fully autonomously. Driving may be one of the most complex things we do every day. Drivers make dozens of decisions at any given moment. One study found that drivers Were exposed to over 1,300 items of information per minute. We make so many decisions when we’re driving without even thinking about it. So in creating our vehicle, a great component of the enterprise was developing software to handle lots of sensors, feeding lots of data, and generating a bunch of potential paths that the vehicle might follow.

    And even though the robot doesn’t have the ability to predict the future, by using this fast random path generation, the robot could anticipate a potential accident and choose a path to avoid it because its always thinking about what things could the car do next. No one expects millions of cars driving themselves anytime soon. But there is a place where self-navigating technologies are being optimized to create the vehicle of the future. We’re on the Scania test track outside Stockholm, where we have basically, it looks like a highway but it’s a separate test track where we conduct our own experiments. Scania, the Swedish trucking company, has recently begun testing its next generation of long-haul truck, utilizing radar, sonar, and intelligent mapping. They’ve been able to drastically reduce fuel consumption. Jonas Martensson: We have this example with platooning, where will make use of the reduction in air resistance, or air drag, that you get from driving close to each other with heavy duty vehicles. And in order to control this, you need to know where the other vehicles are, their position, their velocity, their actions in the near future.

    And to be very close to the vehicle ahead of you, it requires that you have a very accurate control. If you look at robotics broadly, there’s a wonderful set of research of people looking at schooling fish and trying to develop the ability for robots to work together like that. So there are wonderful examples from nature of how cooperation can lead to more efficient resource utilization. Jonas Hofstedt: You can see it when people are competing in Tour de France. They platoon to reduce air drag. They are not bicycling behind each other that close because it’s fun, or because they are racing, it is because they are reducing air drag sitting behind the man who is leading. A truck traveling 55 miles per hour expends half its energy just to move the air around it. At 65 miles per hour, that number jumps to almost two-thirds. Even if platooning can reduce the energy used by 10 percent, the savings would be substantial. If a vehicle in front of another vehicle wants to brake, it immediately sends out the brake message to the other vehicles, so they actually brake at the same time. Hassad Alem: The way we do this is by, we have an automated system.

    So now for instance, if i take my feet off the acceleration pedal, and turn the system on, the velocity is automatically governed by getting information from the vehicle ahead through its wireless system. We want these vehicles to maintain a short relative distance. So through this system, we can reduce fuel consumption by utulizing the air drag reduction by 10%. and 10% would mean you would be able to save approximately 8,000 Euros per single heavyduty vehicle per year. It may be sometime before autonomous vehicles make up the majority of cars on America’s highways. Nevertheless, some of these technologies are already making their way into our lives. Now this polar baby wants to sleep. Do you get to pick out books every day or is it just… I get to pick out books sometimes. Okay. When we look toward the future, the systems will absolutely make it safer and more efficient and less costly for you and also make your life easier because you’re spending less time on the roads. The city begins to talk, begins to tell you where is there congestion, what’s going on in different areas of town? Suddenly the car becomes a part of a much bigger ecosystem.

    We can look at how cars interact with other cars, how cars interact with infrastructure and us, the drivers, can start to make smart decisions about how to move around. Suddenly, mobility becomes a whole other thing. Paul Goldberger: No matter how much money they have, no matter how much oil they have, everybody has to go in a different direction. We’ve seen that changing the way we drive can improve transportation efficiencies. But what if we change the way we build and live in our cities? That’s the subject of our next story, “Searching for Utopia”. We’ll travel to the United Arab Emirates, and discover a city rising out of the desert.

    Let’s take a look. From the beginning, we’ve dreamed of Utopia. A place where we could live in harmony with each other, and in balance with nature. Many have imagined it, tried to design it, but the dream always slipped away. Then, I heard they were building a new city called “Masdar”, near Abu Dhabi, in the Arabian desert. It sounded like an unlikely place for Utopia, and I wanted to see it. The last half-century has been a pretty bad time for the making of cities, mostly. The natural tendency has been to accommodate to the automobile more than anything else. Try walking around Abu Dhabi, it’s impossible, you have to take a car everywhere.

    Dubai, the same thing. They are among the least pedestrian-friendly places in the world, they are not green by any other measure either, and these are not easy things to fix. Masdar is still under construction, and it doesn’t look like much from the highway. But they claim it’s going to redefine the way cities are designed, built, and powered. Masdar City in Abu Dhabi, will be the city of the future, and the role model for the world. Once you see what they’ve envisioned for this utopian city, its very impressive. It’s carbon-neutral, pedestrian friendly and powered by renewable energies.

    But I do notice, we’re going to have to change our relationship with cars. Car audio: Welcome to Masdar City. Austin Relton: We are driving in the bowels of Masdar City in an electric transportation system. It’s slightly unnerving to see this for the first time and “where are we going?” the first big move the architects at foster and partners made was to put all transportation underneath the city, leaving the streets of Masdar totally free of cars.

    The place reminded me of a medieval city. And actually, many design elements are adapted from ancient Arabic towns and villages. It’s all about looking back into history to move forward. There are some very very simple ideas that have a huge impact. This is a pedestrian zone, there’s no cars here. This has enabled us to push our streets together to take advantage of the shade, channel the cooling breezes through. The whole scale here is based on the human being, its not based on the motor car. As soon as you lift up the pedestrian plane by seven meters, you’ve suddenly captured this breeze.

    What you can see here on the balcony is we’ve got a modern interpretation of an ancient Arabic screen. What we must avoid is direct sunlight hitting any piece of glass. As soon as the sun hits the glass, the heat’s transferred into the building and we have to use more energy to cool it down. Can this really make all that much of a difference? Yeah, absolutely. For example, downtown Abu Dhabi… sixty-meter wide streets, black asphalt, mirrored reflective buildings, no relief from the sun. On a day in September, the air temperature in both places was 39 degrees. in Abu Dhabi, the temperature measured at the asphalt was 57 degrees. in Masdar, the temperature measured on the ground, 33 degrees, so we’ve actually lowered the air temperature. We’re trying to do as much as possible, with as little as possible. These simple design moves, cut air conditioning needs by 60%. But this place is also, technically, very sophisticated. The roof panels not only provide shade, they also generate electricity.

    And the walls themselves are made of glass reinforced concrete, literally sand taken from the desert. Everything here is geared towards maximizing energy efficiency. Masdar does represent a whole different value system. It represents an acknowledgment that, eventually, everybody has to go in a different kind of direction. No matter how much money they have, no matter how much oil they have, no matter anything else. All of the cities here in this part of the world have come out of nowhere. There was nothing here not so long ago, except small settlements in the desert. And then all of this oil and all of this money, and suddenly, you know, wham, these cities started popping up.

    But they sprung up in a false love of a Western model that was already out of date. The model of the late 20th century automobile-based energy-hogging city. For most of the world, energy is very expensive. But the United Arab Emirates is sitting on 10% of the world’s oil, and energy is cheap, so cheap you can run a ski slope in a shopping mall, and build the world’s tallest skyscraper. But even here, cheap energy won’t last forever, and the people behind Masdar are determined to find alternatives. Martin Haigh: One of the most crucial aspects of our energy odeling and scenario quantification is how much energy in total is the world going to use in 2050. Wim Thomas: The scenarios team is a bunch of people with rich imagination, I would say. Adam Newton: We have political scientists, economists, geopolitical experts.

    Really we try to simplify the complexity all around us. Jeremy Bentham: We in the Scenarios team are currently putting a lot of attention into cities and city development. A lot of megacities are going to be built in the coming decades. We’re talking about the equivalent of a new city of a million people every week. That is an incredible demand. Most of the world’s resources are consumed by the cities. What if we could offer a blueprint for a better city? Public transportation, information, energy. We understand demand will rise, we understand the current supplies will struggle to keep pace. So we have to of course, find ways of bridging the gap between the demand and the supply. Decisions that we take now are going to have a major impact on decades to come. There’s enough oil under these sands to last 150 years.

    But fundamental to the Masdar ideal, is getting energy from renewable sources, from geothermal and wind, and most of all, from a source they have in abundance in the desert: the sun. This field of solar panels makes more than enough electricity to run Masdar, and the excess power is sent to the Abu Dhabi grid. But silicon panels are expensive, and the price of solar power needs to drop if its going to be competitive from Africa to Asia to Arizona. in the future, Masdar hopes to get energy from this prototype called the solar beam down.

    Uusing highly reflective mirrors, the solar beam down may generate power more cheaply and ecologically than silicon panels. The mirrors bounce the suns rays up to the tower, and then down to a point. reaching a temperature of 600 degrees, steam can be generated to run turbines to make electricity. There’s just one problem: neither of these solar technologies work at night. So Masdar needs to draw power from the grid when the sun goes down, and that power comes from natural gas. The reality is, it’s just not yet possible to power Masdar entirely without fossil fuels. The great challenge with Masdar, will be “how do you make it a place that will not be just this ideal city that no other place could actually aspire to, ’cause it doesn’t seem real.” What Masdar has to be is a laboratory that develops things that then can be applied in existing cities all around the world, because that’s where it will pay off. There’s no pay off if it’s just about itself. The payoff is “how can everything it’s trying to do matter in the rest of the world?” Right now, there’s only a store, two restaurants, a bank, and a few hundred students living here.

    It’s too early to tell if Masdar will work as a city when it’s finished, but much has been achieved: they are carbon-neutral, and largely, powered by renewable energies. Solutions here won’t work everywhere though, many cities are in cold climates, and cooling is not their energy problem. They need to let sunlight in, not keep it out. Cities like Los Angeles or Houston are built around cars.

    Can Masdar’s lessons be applied to them? Still, its a step in the right direction. And, its impressive that this step is being taken by a country that doesn’t need to take it. I met a guy who said “actually, they did need to take it.” He took me to the desert to explain. Muhamad Alkhalil: God says… [arabic] God talks about man’s place in, in the universe. That this world is a trust. And god offered this trust to the mountains, to the heavens, to the land, to earth, and all refused it, refused to take this trust. But man being adventurous, vain, maybe too ambitious, being man accepted it. Now, accepting it, there is a responsibility. Taking responsibility isn’t always easy. Utopia may be unattainable, but we must reach for it, and Masdar does give us a clue to what cities will be like in the future.

    They may not look quite like Masdar, but they will be shaped by the same concerns. By energy. Where it comes from, and how its used. The way we’ve been building cities lately is unsustainable. We can’t go on building them that way. But to say that we can’t build cities the way we have been building them doesn’t mean we can’t build cities in the future. In fact, we have to build cities. Cities are the essential statement of human civilization.

    So, we will continue to make them, but we have to make them in a different way. what we’ve seen is that the world of 2050 won’t look drastically different from the world today, but the challenges of a growing population and increased energy use demand real solutions. Its innovations like those we’ve just seen that will be critical in charting our path to the world of 2050..

    As found on Youtube

    Man: TO ONLY TALK ABOUT AESTHETICS IS ACTUALLY KIND OF INSULTING TO AN ARCHITECT BECAUSE THAT’S THE RESULT OF SOMETHING. IT’S WHAT IT FINALLY LOOKS LIKE. BUT THAT RESULT, LIKE THE LUNAR LANDING MODULE OR HELICOPTER, IS THE RESULT OF A SERIES OF PROCESSES OF THINKING THAT WENT INTO IT, THAT Allow IT TO BEHAVE A CERTAIN SORT OF WAY. WE’VE GONE FROM I LIKE OR DON’T LIKE THIS BUILDING, TO UNDERSTANDING WHAT THE BUILDING DOES AND TRACING THAT THROUGH TO A BROAD VALUE SYSTEM OR ETHIC OF WHERE WE HAVE TO BEHAVE AS A CULTURE TO FIT IN THE WORLD. Wife: WHAT WE’RE Create HERE IS Best available OF THIS TIME.

    IT IS ABOUT THE FUTURE, IT IS ABOUT WHAT WE’RE TRYING TO DELIVER FOR THE PUBLIC, FOR OUR CHILDREN, TO SEE Best available OF AMERICAN ARCHITECTURE. Mayne: IT’S ABOUT ASKING QUESTIONS AND IT’S ABOUT DEVELOPING, LITERALLY SMART BUILDINGS. SOME PEOPLE WILL LIKE IT AND SOME NOT. BUT IT’S MUCH LESS IMPORTANT THAN ACTUALLY ASKING WHAT THE BUILDING DOES OR DOESN’T DO. CAN RETHINKING A BUILDING’S DESIGN ACTUALLY MAKE PEOPLE WORK MORE EFFICIENTLY , MORE CREATIVELY, MORE DEMOCRATICALLY ? PERHAPS NOWHERE IS THAT RETHINKING MORE APPROPRIATE THAN IN THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT . THE NEW SAN FRANCISCO FEDERAL BUILDING COMMISSIONED BY THE U.S. GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION, OR THE GSA , IS ANOTHER SIGN THAT THINGS ARE CHANGING . FOR A PERIOD OF TIME IN THE 1960 s AND’ 70 s, THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT WAS BUILDING A NOT VERY DISTINGUISHED STABLE OF PROJECTS TO HOUSE THE ACTIVITIES OF THE GOVERNMENT.

    AND WHAT WAS HAPPENING IS 20 YEARS DOWN THE ROAD, Is well OF THESE UNFORESEEN COSTS IN MAINTENANCE AND UPKEEP AND REPLACEMENT. WE’VE HAD THE UNFORTUNATE ECONOMIC IMPETUS TO BUILD QUICKLY, CHEAPLY, AND TURN OVER. BIG WAREHOUSE-LIKE BUILDINGS THAT WERE BUILT ON THE CHEAP, THEY LACKED PERSONALITY, THEY LACKED SOUL. PEOPLE DIDN’T LIKE TO WORK THERE, COMMUNITIES DIDN’T WELCOME THEM — THEY STILL DON’T — AND NOW, THERE’S AN ENORMOUS OPPORTUNITY TO RETHINK WHAT THOSE BUILDINGS CAN BE. AMERICANS ARE ALL TOO FAMILIAR WITH UNINSPIRING , WASTEFUL OFFICE BUILDINGS . MID-LEVEL EMPLOYEES JAMMED INTO FLUORESCENTLY LIT CUBICLES , SPEND MORE THAN HALF OF THEIR WAKING HOURS THERE . THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT , AS THE COUNTRY’S LARGEST EMPLOYER OF TWO MILLION PEOPLE , HAD AN OPPORTUNITY TO RESHAPE THE WORKPLACE . ALL IT WOULD TAKE WAS LEADERSHIP TO RECOGNIZE THE POWER OF DESIGN INNOVATION . THE GSA IS ACTUALLY THE GOVERNMENT’S LANDLORD, AND THEY ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR ABOUT 300 MILLION SQUARE FEET OF PRIMARILY OFFICE SPACE THROUGHOUT THE UNITED STATES.

    SO THEY ARE PROBABLY THE COUNTRY’S LARGEST DEVELOPER, MANAGER, AND ENTREPRENEUR OF REAL ESTATE IN THE COUNTRY. THE GOAL WAS TO REACH OUT TO THE PRIVATE SECTOR TO FIND TOP-QUALITY DESIGN TALENT FOR NEW GSA BUILDINGS . THE SAN FRANCISCO FEDERAL BUILDING IS ONE OF THREE PARTNERSHIPS BETWEEN THE GSA AND CUTTING-EDGE L.A.-BASED ARCHITECT THOM MAYNE . OUR PERCEPTION HERE — WE WOULD HAVE BEEN THE LAST PEOPLE IMAGINABLE TO BE THOUGHT ABOUT AS DOING FEDERAL GOVERNMENT WORK. THIS — THE COURTHOUSE, THE NOAA PROJECT — FOR ME, IT’S BEEN A REALLY INTERESTING KIND OF RIDE AND IT’S BEEN FINALLY IMMENSELY FULFILLING AS WE NOW COMPLETE THE THIRD OF OUR THREE BUILDINGS. WE WERE USED TO LOTS OF MEDIOCRE PROJECTS. SO WHAT WE REALLY WANTED TO DO WITH DESIGN EXCELLENCE WAS FOCUS ON THE MOST IMPORTANT ISSUE ABOUT THE BUILDING. WHO WOULD BE THE ARCHITECT THAT WOULD BE RESPONSIBLE FOR THE CREATIVITY, New innovations, THE IMAGE, THE FUNCTIONALITY — EVERYTHING THAT IS IMPORTANT ABOUT A Build, THE THINGS THAT LAST FOREVER? IT’S VERY IMPORTANT THAT ONE OF THE MESSAGES MUST BE THAT BUILDINGS MUST CONTINUE TO REPRESENT THE HIGHEST IDEALS OF WHAT WE BELIEVE IN AS A SOCIETY AND AS A CIVILIZATION.

    I Envision, IN THE LAST 10 YEARS, WE’VE BEEN SUCCESSFUL IN BRINGING IN NEW TALENT AND WE’VE BEEN SUCCESSFUL IN SHOWING WHAT AMERICANS, IN TERMS OF DESIGN AND INNOVATION, CAN SHOW IN OUR BUILDINGS. IT HAS TAKEN A BACKWATER, WHICH IS WHAT GSA WAS THIRTY YEARS AGO IN THE ARCHITECTURAL FIEL, AND IT HAS PROPELLED THAT WHOLE DIALOGUE INTO A VERY SPIRITED DISCUSSION AS TO WHAT ARCHITECTURE IS ABOUT OR SHOULD BE ABOUT, AND WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF ARCHITECTURE IN THIS COUNTRY. THOM MAYNE, THE 2005 PRITZKER-PRIZE-WINNING , COUNTERCULTURIST, ICONOCLASTIC ARCHITECT , FOUNDED THE DESIGN FIRM MORPHOSIS IN THE EARLY 1970 s . HIS BUILDINGS ARE KNOWN FOR REFLECTING Is not simply THEIR TIMES , BUT ALSO THE CONFLICTS, CONTRADICTIONS , AND ASPIRATIONS THAT DEFINE THEM . Mayne: WE DON’T PRODUCE THING YOU’VE SEEN BEFORE, WE PRODUCE THINGS YOU’VE NEVER SEEN BEFORE, THAT’S ALL WE DO. WE PRODUCE PROTOTYPES, ESSENTIALLY BECAUSE ALL WE’RE INTERESTED IN IS PRODUCING BUILDINGS THAT RESPOND TO A PARTICULAR SITUATION AND A PARTICULAR PROGRAM, A PARTICULAR SITE. A SET OF PROGRAMMATIC CIRCUMSTANCES NOW, IN THIS TIME OF HISTORY. IN THE U.S.

    ALONE , MAYNE’S WORK SPANS FROM CALIFORNIA TO MARYLAND , FROM HIGH SCHOOLS TO COURTHOUSES . EACH UNIQUE PROJECT REFLECTS A BOLD UNORTHODOX APPROACH WITH ONE UNIFYING ELEMENT — AN UNCOMPROMISING DESIRE TO MARRY FORM WITH FUNCTION . HE’S ALWAYS SET HIMSELF APART AS THE — NOT THE BAD BOY, BUT THE ARTIST, LET’S SAY, WHO WAS SOMEWHAT APART FROM THE ESTABLISHMENT. BUT DOING A FEDERAL OFFICE BUILDING, AND A FEDERAL COURTHOUSE AND A NATIONAL OCEANOGRAPHIC HEADQUARTERS IN MARYLAND, YOU’RE NOT DEALING WITH THE OUTER FRINGES HERE, YOU’RE DEALING WITH MAINSTREAM, MAJOR WORK. SO, HERE’S AN INDIVIDUAL WHO’S EXTREMELY SERIOUS, AND SO HE’S GOT IDEAS ABOUT POLITICS AND PHILOSOPHY, BUT HE’S AN ARCHITECT, SO HE WORKS THOSE OUT IN THE PHYSICAL WORLD.

    Man: I Envision THE INTERESTING Thing ABOUT THOM IS THAT THE WAY HE TALKS ABOUT HIS BUILDINGS IS THAT THEY REPRESENT FREEDOM AND OPENNESS AND A KIND OF OPTIMISTIC SPIRIT ABOUT WHAT ARCHITECTURE CAN DO, AND I Envision MOST PEOPLE, INCLUDING ME, SEE THEM AS MUCH MORE AGGRESSIVE, AND THEY HAVE A KIND OF BROODING QUALITY, OFTEN, AND SO, YEAH, I Necessitate, IT WOULD TAKE A PSYCHOLOGIST TO SORT OF UNTANGLE ALL THE CONTRADICTIONS IN THE WORK, BUT THAT’S WHAT MAKES IT REALLY FASCINATING. EVEN THOUGH I’VE BEEN, PROBABLY, MORE CRITICAL OF HIS WORK THAN MOST CRITICS, I ALSO Envision HE’S ONE OF THE MOST FASCINATING ARCHITECTS BECAUSE OF ALL THOSE CONTRADICTIONS. Mayne: I Envision ALL ARCHITECTS ARE THE SAME IN SOME WAY. I Envision WHEN I WAS A KID, I Appeared OUT THE WINDOW AND I JUST SAID, “THAT SUCKS.” I PROBABLY Told IT IN THOSE EXACT WORDS, ACTUALLY.

    I CAN DO THAT BETTER, OR I Crave TO CHANGE SOMETHING. I ALSO GREW UP IN THE’ 60 s, AND THAT HAD TO HAVE AN EFFECT ON ME. THE WORLD WAS CHANGING HUGELY. Of course, THERE WAS AN EXPLOSION IN CULTURE AT EVERY LEVEL. CLEARLY, I’M A PRODUCT OF THAT. WE NEED ARCHITECTURE WHICH IS THOUGHTFUL AND RESPONSIVE TO THE NATURE OF THE SPECIFICS OF THE PLACE, BOTH IN HUMANISTIC AND URBAN TERMS, AS WELL AS IN CLIMATOLOGICAL TERMS. YOU TAKE THIS BUILDING THAT’S VERY GENERIC AND YOU START WITH ANOTHER SET OF QUESTIONS, AND THE FIRST QUESTIONS ARE CHALLENGING ITS GENERICNESS.

    ARE THESE BUILDINGS — WHY ARE THEY GENERIC, AND IS THAT A NECESSITY AND DOES THAT REALLY — IS THAT USEFUL FOR THE NATURE OR THE CULTURE OF A WORKPLACE? AND AS WE STARTED ASKING QUESTIONS, IT JUST BECAME REALLY INTERESTING BECAUSE YOU’RE GOING, WELL, ACTUALLY, THE WORKPLACE IS A PROBLEM WE HAVEN’T REALLY LOOKED AT, AND WHY DON’T WE JUST KIND OF REFOCUS ON KIND OF WHAT IT Entails AS YOU SPEND YOUR 8, 9, 10 HOURS A DAY IN THIS PLACE, RIGHT? I Envision, IF WE’RE REALLY SUCCESSFUL, IT WOULDN’T EVEN BE ABOUT THE BUILDING, “It wouldve been” AS A REAL SUCCESS, AS REPLACING THE MODEL WITH A NEW MODEL. AND THAT WOULD BE A MUCH, MUCH MORE AMBITIOUS GOAL THAN JUST MAKING A BUILDING. SO, WE’RE STANDING ON THE 13 th FLOOR OF THE SAN FRANCISCO FEDERAL BUILDING. THIS IS A 600,000 -SQUARE-FOOT OFFICE Build THAT SITS RIGHT AT THE CORNER OF 7th AND MISSION, AND WE ARE IN THE TOWER PORTION OF THE BUILDING. THE PROJECT IS DEFINITELY SPECIFIC TO THE TEMPERATE CLIMATE IN SAN FRANCISCO. AS DESIGNERS, ONE OF THE FIRST QUESTIONS WE BEGAN TO ASK IS, WHAT ARE THE SPECIFIC ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS ON THIS SITE? WHAT ARE THE ORIENTATIONS WITH REGARD TO SUN? WHERE ARE THE MAJOR SOLAR GAINS GOING TO BE HAPPENING ON THE PROJECT? AND WHAT ARE THE WIND CONDITIONS? WE KNOW THAT SAN FRANCISCO, AS A PENINSULA, HAS REALLY GOOD PREVAILING WINDS.

    SO, WE STARTED, By the start, TO CANVASS 50 YEARS’ WORTH OF WEATHER DATA IN ORDER TO OPTIMIZE SOME OF THE BASIC DESIGN MOVES AND TIE THEM TO THIS SITE. IN THE CASE OF THIS PARTICULAR PROJECT, WE WERE VERY INTERESTED IN THE IDEA OF WORKPLACE QUALITY, WHICH IS TO SAY, HOW DO PEOPLE ACTUALLY ENGAGE IN AN EXPERIENTIAL WAY, THEIR ENVIRONMENT AS THEY ARE WORKING. THIS IS LIKE DOING A SMALL CITY, IN A WAY. THERE’S 2,000 PEOPLE COMING TO WORK IN THE BUILDING EVERY SINGLE DAY, AND WHERE WE BEGAN AS DESIGNERS WAS TO TAKE A REALLY HARD LOOK AT WHAT THE EXPERIENCE WOULD BE OF THE INDIVIDUAL WHO’S COMING TO SIT AT A WORKSTATION AND SPEND MAYBE THE NEXT 25 YEARS OF THEIR LIFE WORKING FOR A PARTICULAR FEDERAL AGENCY.

    THE BUILDING’S SITING AND ORIENTATION MAXIMIZE THE AMOUNT OF SUNLIGHT THAT CAN FILTER IN , AND THE STRUCTURE’S UNUSUALLY NARROW FOOTPRIT HELPS THAT SUNLIGHT PENETRATE DEEP INTO THE BUILDING . Christ: THERE IS A SERIES OF VERY INEXPENSIVE SENSORS THAT ARE GOING TO BE MONITORING THE DAYLIGHT ENTERING THE SPACE, AND WHEN THE LIGHTS ARE NOT REQUIRED, THEY WILL BE DIMMED DOWN TO ZERO. THE ESTIMATES FOR LIGHTING IN OFFICE BUILDINGS, THEY RANGE BETWEEN 30% TO 40% OF THE TOTAL ENERGY USE. SO, IF WE CAN ABSOLUTELY OBVIATE THE NEED FOR THEM AND ALSO GET RID OF THE HEAT GAINS THAT THE LIGHTS MAY BE PUTTING INTO THE SPACE, WE’VE GONE A LONG, LONG WAY TOWARDS A SENSIBLE SOLUTION FOR THE BUILDING. ANYONE WHO’S WORKED INSIDE A MODERN OFFICE HAS BEEN SUBJECTED TO THE OVER-CHILLED AIR OF SUMMER AND THE DRY, STUFFY HEAT OF WINTER — BOTH MAJOR USES OF ENERGY . THE SAN FRANCISCO FEDERAL BUILDING’S SOPHISTICATED TECHNOLOGY ALLOWS FOR SOMETHING UNPRECEDENTED — NATURAL VENTILATION . IT ALSO GIVES THOSE WHO Operate THERE SOMETHING ELSE UNPRECEDENTED — CONTROL . THERE’S A GREAT PSYCHOLOGICAL BENEFIT TO HAVING CONTROL OVER YOUR ENVIRONMENT.

    WE’VE KNOWN THIS FOR A LONG Day, BUT IT’S A VERY DIFFICULT THING TO ACHIEVE IN BIG OFFICE BUILDINGS. LOCAL BUILDING CODES ALL AROUND THE UNITED STATES TYPICALLY PROHIBIT THE USE OF OPERABLE WINDOWS IN COMMERCIAL OFFICE BUILDINGS, AND WHAT WE WERE ABLE TO DO WAS SHOW THE GSA’S FIRE PROTECTION ENGINEER THAT WE WERE MEETING A HIGHER OR EQUIVALENT LEVEL OF LIFE SAFETY IN THE BUILDING, EVEN THOUGH ALL THE WINDOWS OPEN. AND SO, WE’RE ON A MODEL WHICH IS CLOSER TO A EUROPEAN MODEL. Mayne: ONE OF THE FIRST THINGS WE ASKED OUR MECHANICAL ENGINEER — COULD WE Envision ABOUT TAKING THE AIR CONDITIONING OUT? IS IT EVEN POSSIBLE? JUST ASK THE DUMBEST QUESTION. THEY GO, OH, ACTUALLY, UM, ACTUALLY, IT COULD BE — IT’S PLAUSIBLE. Christ: THE BUILDING RELIES ON THE DIURNAL SHIFT BETWEEN DAYTIME AND NIGHTTIME TEMPERATURE.

    SO, IN A NUTSHELL, DURING THE WARM WEATHER IN SAN FRANCISCO, THE BUILDING AUTOMATION SYSTEM, IN THE EVENING, WILL OPEN THOSE VENT WINDOWS. THERE ARE SMALL MOTORS THAT ARE ATTACHED TO THEM AND ALLOW COOL NIGHT AIR TO ENTER THE BUILDING, WHICH IS MAYBE 20 TO 25 DEGREES COOLER THAN THE DAYTIME TEMPERATURE, AND BATHE ALL OF THESE CONCRETE CEILINGS IN COOL AIR. THERE ARE SENSORS WHICH ARE BURIED INSIDE THIS CONCRETE CEILING, AT WHICH TIME WE HAVE ABSORBED ENOUGH COOLING ENERGY INTO THE STRUCTURE THE WINDOWS WILL CLOSE AND SEAL THAT COOLING ENERGY IN.

    SO, PEOPLE COME TO WORK THE NEXT DAY, AND THE CONCEPTUAL BASIS OF THE BUILDING IS THAT WE WILL HAVE STORED ENOUGH COOLING ENERGY IN THE STRUCTURE ITSELF TO OFFSET THE HEAT GAINS OF The following. SO, AS PEOPLE COME TO WORK AND THE SUN COMES UP AND STARTS SHINING IN THE BUILDING AND THEY TURN THEIR Computer ON, THEY START MAKING COFFEE AND TURNING MICROWAVES ON TO WARM UP THEIR DANISH OR SOMETHING, YOU START TO ACCUMULATE A LOT OF HEAT GAIN DURING THE DAY. WELL, THE FOLLOWING EVENING, THE BUILDING WILL OPEN AND ALL THOSE GAINS WILL BE FLUSHED OUT AGAIN. WE CALL IT A NIGHT FLUSH. NOW SOMETHING THAT IS VERY, VERY IMPORTANT IN THE WHOLE CONCEPT OF THE DESIGN AS WELL IS The facts of the case THAT WE HAVE A PERFORATED STAINLESS STEEL SCRIM ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF THE BUILDING WHICH IS Shadowing THE GLASS AND REPELLING ABOUT 50% OF THE SOLAR GAIN, AND ON THE NORTH SIDE, WE HAVE A SERIES OF GLASS SUNSHADES THAT ARE FIXED AGAINST LOW SUN ANGLES IN THE SUMMERTIME.

    SO, WE’VE DONE TWO SPECIFIC SOLUTIONS ON THE EXTERIOR OF THE BUILDING TO HELP MODULATE THE HEAT GAINS BECAUSE THAT’S THE BIGGEST ISSUE IN DOING LOW-ENERGY COOLING. MAYNE’S TEAM USED DESIGN Is not simply TO SAVE ENERGY , BUT ALSO TO RESHAPE THE CULTURE OF THE WORKPLACE AND PROMOTE INTERACTION AND CONNECTION BETWEEN PEOPLE . WE REVERSED THE ORDER OF MANAGEMENT AND STAFF — WE PUT THE MANAGEMENT ON THE INSIDE AND THE STAFF ON THE OUTSIDE. THEY DON’T GET THE CORNER VIEW, THE LITTLE OFFICES THAT ARE ON THE EDGES, WHERE THEY CAN HIDE AWAY AND LOOK OUT THE WINDOW. THEY ARE ON THE INSIDE, WHERE THEY CONNECT AND HAVE INTERCONNECTION. ONE OF THE MORE UNIQUE INNOVATIONS OF THE SAN FRANCISCO FEDERAL BUILDING IS ITS SKIP-STOP EXPRESS ELEVATORS , WHICH STOP EVERY THIRD FLOOR AND ENCOURAGE WORKERS TO WALK EITHER UP OR DOWN A FLIGHT OF STAIRS . WHEN WE TALKED ABOUT A HEALTHY ENVIRONMENT, WHAT CONSTITUTES A HEALTHY WORK ENVIRONMENT, WE TALKED ABOUT WALKING.

    THERE’S ONE THIRD THE AMOUNT OF STOPS. YOU GET EFFICIENCY, AND YOU PRODUCE THESE SECOND KIND OF ORDER OF LOBBIES. IT’S PART OF A SOCIAL MODEL, AN INTERACTIVE MODEL, AND WE’RE GETTING INTERESTING RESPONSES BACK THAT THEY LIKE IT, THAT IT PROMOTES INTERCONNECTION. I Envision THIS IS A Build THAT’S GOING TO HAVE TO BE LEARNED, AND I Envision IT WILL BE LEARNED VERY QUICKLY BY THE PEOPLE WHO WORK WITHIN IT. IT’S NOT MEANT TO CALM US AS MUCH AS IT IS TO INSTRUCT US. IT’S SOMETHING, I Envision, TO MAKE US WAKE UP BECAUSE THERE ARE SO MANY IDEAS EMPLOYED IN THIS BUILDING THAT WE’VE NOT REALLY SEEN TYPICALLY EMPLOYED, CERTAINLY IN FEDERAL CONSTRUCTION OR EVEN IN THE AVERAGE OFFICE Build. Ciprazo: THIS IS A NEIGHBORHOOD THAT I’VE WORKED IN AND GROWN UP IN, IT HAS BEEN KIND OF NEGLECTED BY THE CITY.

    SO, A BIG ISSUE, WHEN WE DO BUILD IN A CITY, IS TO LOOK AT A PLACE WHERE PEOPLE HAVE NEGLECTED. IF WE INVEST THE DOLLARS IN THAT AREA, THEN WE SEE THAT AS A GENESIS OF OTHER PEOPLE INVESTING IN THAT AREA. MAYNE AND HIS TEAM SOUGHT TO INTEGRATE THE NEW BUILDING INTO ITS NEIGHBORHOOD BY USING THE BUILDING’S AMENITIES TO CREATE LINKS BETWEEN THE PEOPLE WHO Operate THERE AND THE COMMUNITY . WE TOOK THE CAFE WHICH IS USUALLY INSIDE THESE AND PUT IT ON THE STREET, SO THEY COME OUT OF THE BUILDING, THEY JOIN THE WORLD.

    THEY SIT IN THE PLAZA. THEY INTERACT WITH THE REST OF THE COMMUNITY, AND USE THAT ACTUALLY TO ACTIVATE THE COMMUNITY. Ciprazo: MY VISION WAS TO ACTUALLY BRING INTO THIS NEIGHBORHOOD A PLACE THAT HAD OPEN SPACE THAT PEOPLE COULD FEEL SAFE IN, WAS TO BRING FACILITIES FOR THE NEIGHBORHOOD THAT THEY COULD USE, LIKE, SAY, OUR CONFERENCE CENTER AFTER HOURS FOR, You are familiar with, COMMUNITY GROUPS TO HAVE PLAYS. TO Deliver THE CHILD CARE CENTER THAT IS OPEN TO THE PUBLIC, SO THAT WE’RE NOT JUST AN ISOLATED FEDERAL COMPLEX IN THE MIDDLE OF A NEIGHBORHOOD. WE BECOME A PART OF THE FABRIC OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD. Mayne: I Envision, Is not simply DOES IT HAVE AN OPPORTUNITY OF BEING A MODEL FOR OTHER GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS OF THIS TYPE — OR OTHER TYPES, EVEN, AS FAR AS THAT GOES — IT ACTUALLY HAS AN OPPORTUNITY OF RETHINKING OFFICE BUILDINGS IN GENERAL FOR THE PRIVATE SECTOR.

    BUT WE HAVE TO WAIT A WHILE TO SEE IF THAT’S TRUE OR NOT. I Pass YOU THE PRITZKER-AWARD-WINNING THOM MAYNE.[ APPLAUSE] SOMEBODY PUT LITTLE METAL PIECES IN ALL THE BENCHES, AND I Envision IT DOESN’T ALLOW KIDS TO SKATEBOARD. AND I’M GOING TO SAY NO. WE WANT CHILDREN. WE WANT YOUNG PEOPLE IN THIS CITY. WE Crave SKATEBOARDERS — THEY ACTIVATE THE CITY.

    IT’S FANTASTIC. TIMOTHY LEARY ONCE SAID , “THINK FOR YOURSELF AND QUESTION AUTHORITY.” FOR THOM MAYNE AND HIS BUILDINGS , IT IS ABOUT QUESTIONING WHAT THE STATUS QUO IS , EVEN IN THE WAY WE THINK ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY . Mayne: SUSTAINABILITY — FINALLY, IT HAS TO START WITH AN INTELLIGENCE OF HOW WE USE ENERGY. IT’S AS SIMPLE AS THAT. AND IN TODAY’S WORLD, IT’S NOT ROCKET SCIENCE. TO THE EMBARRASSMENT OF OUR CULTURE, THE U.S.

    USES JUST ABOUT TWICE THE AMOUNT OF ENERGY OF THE AVERAGE EUROPEAN. THEY SEE US AS GLUTTONS, AND THEY SHOULD. AND WE HAVE TO SOLVE THIS, AND THIS SEEMS TO BE AN ISSUE THAT PEOPLE ARE EXTREMELY INTERESTED IN TODAY, AND IT BECAME AN ABSOLUTE PRIORITY IN THIS BUILDING. Ciprazo: WHEN I Envision ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY, I Envision ABOUT IT IN A LARGER VIEW. IT ISN’T ABOUT JUST ENERGY SAVINGS. IT ISN’T JUST ABOUT HOW MANY BTUs PER SQUARE FOOT WE’RE SAVING. SUSTAINABILITY IS ABOUT, HOW IS THIS BUILDING SUSTAINABLE IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD? HOW, IN 100 YEARS, IS IT STILL SUSTAINABLE IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD? Ivy: I Envision PEOPLE’S PERCEPTION OF THIS BUILDING WILL SHIFT RADICALLY AS THEY GET TO KNOW IT. IT’S GOING TO BECOME AN ICONIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE CITY, AND, I Envision, PERHAPS, In different countries. IN THE State, WE’VE NOT HAD A MAJOR OFFICE Build THAT ATTEMPTS THIS LEVEL OF FULLY INTEGRATED ENERGY SAVINGS AND SUSTAINABILITY THROUGHOUT THE ENTIRE FABRIC OF THE BUILDING. I DO Envision IT REPRESENTS A REALLY SIGNIFICANT STEP FORWARD IN INTEGRATING SOME OF THESE IDEAS ABOUT SOCIAL INTERACTION AND ALSO ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY INSIDE THE BUILDING.

    IT’S NOT PERFECT AS A GREEN BUILDING — THERE ARE LOTS OF INEFFICIENCIES ABOUT IT, STILL. I MEAN, THERE’S A LOT OF STEEL IN THAT BUILDING THAT’S USED IN A PRETTY ORNAMENTAL WAY TO DO THESE KINDS OF FOLDED PLANES THAT HAVE ALWAYS BEEN AN IMPORTANT MOTIF IN HIS WORK, BUT THEY DON’T SERVE ANY PURPOSE. SO, I Envision IT’S TOUGH FOR SOME PEOPLE WHO ARE INTERESTED IN GREEN DESIGN TO LOOK AT THAT BUILDING AND REALLY SEE IT AS, You are familiar with, AS A MODEL OF SUSTAINABILITY OR EFFICIENCY.

    IN THE END, You are familiar with, THE SUSTAINABILITY OF A BUILDING HAS A LOT MORE TO DO WITH THE FEELINGS OF THE PEOPLE WHO USE IT, I Envision, THAN WE SOMETIMES REALIZE. BECAUSE IF A BUILDING BECOMES SORT OF BELOVED AND IT’S A GREAT PLACE TO WORK, WHETHER OR NOT IT’S EFFICIENT, You are familiar with, IN TERMS OF ITS MECHANICAL SYSTEMS, THEN IT’S GOING TO BE MORE LIKELY TO LAST. IT’S GOING TO BE MORE LIKELY TO BE PRESERVED AND NOT KNOCKED DOWN TO, You are familiar with, MAKE WAY FOR ANOTHER BUILDING, WHICH USES ENTIRELY NEW MATERIALS. SO I Envision THAT’S ONE WAY WE HAVE TO THINK ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY, TOO. IT’S NOT ALWAYS AN AESTHETIC ISSUE. SOMETIMES, IT’S A PHILOSOPHICAL ISSUE THAT MAKES A BUILDING VERY UNIQUE TO ITS COMMUNITY AND ITS ENVIRONMENT. PEOPLE WOULD WRITE AND THEY’D CALL AND THEY’D SAY, “IT DOESN’T LOOK LIKE A SAN FRANCISCO BUILDING.” AND, You are familiar with, THAT’S A REAL TOUGH ONE. SOMETIMES IT’S HARD TO SAY WHAT DOES LOOK LIKE ANY CITY’S BUILDING.

    TRUTHFULLY, JUST THE OVERALL EFFECT, IT FEELS PRETTY UNFINISHED. Man: I Necessitate, I Crave TO LIKE IT, BECAUSE I UNDERSTAND, LIKE, IT REPRESENTS, LIKE, REALLY MODERN TECHNOLOGY AND, You are familiar with, THE NEXT STEP IN BUILDING, AND THINGS LIKE THAT. BUT I HAVEN’T FALLEN IN LOVE WITH IT BY ANY MEANS. Woman: I Envision THAT IT’S WONDERFUL THAT HE USED NATURAL LIGHT. I REALLY DESPISE FLUORESCENT LIGHT, AND IT’S JUST A SUPER STEP IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION REGARDING ARCHITECTURE AND The environmental issues. IT’S VERY CLEAR. IT’S NOT PARTICULARLY INVITING. YEAH, IT’S NOT INVITING, IT’S LIKE — WHEN YOU CAN’T SEE INTO ANY OF THE WINDOWS, THERE’S NO PHOTOGRAPHY FROM ANYWHERE AROUND. IT’S LIKE, WE’RE WATCHING YOU. THAT’S THE FEELING YOU GET. AND YOU CAN’T SEE US. You are familiar with, SO IT’S GREAT THAT IT’S GREEN, BUT I Envision IT’S OVER — You are familiar with, IT’S IN THIS NEIGHBORHOOD AND IT’S LIKE, YEAH, WE’RE WATCHING YOU NOW.

    YEAH, WE’RE HERE. I REALLY DON’T CARE IF SOMEBODY LIKES OR DOESN’T LIKE MY BUILDING — WE DON’T TALK ABOUT, LIKE, BEAUTY OR LOOKS OR — IT’S NOT A DISCUSSION HERE. WE TALK ABOUT THE QUALITY OF THE THING. AGAIN, GOING TO THE HELICOPTER. THEY’RE KIND OF ODD-LOOKING THINGS, AND THE MORE YOU LOOK AT THEM, THE MORE YOU KNOW ABOUT THEM, IT’S VERY POSSIBLE YOU’LL FIND THEM MORE INTERESTING THAN YOU DID THE FIRST TIME YOU SAW IT, INSTEAD OF Reasoning ABOUT IT’S UGLY OR BEAUTY. IT GETS IMMEDIATELY CONTAMINATED BY YOUR KNOWLEDGE, AND NOW, YOU’RE FINDING IT MAYBE NEITHER UGLY OR BEAUTY, BUT JUST INTERESTING. AND AGAIN, I’M MUCH MORE INTERESTED IN THAT. I WOULD BE VERY DISAPPOINTED IF IT’S NEUTRAL AND IT GOT NO RESPONSE. Ciprazo: LET’S PUSH THE ENVELOPE A LITTLE SO PEOPLE ARE OUT OF THEIR COMFORT LEVEL, BUT IT’S NOT FOR ANYTHING NEGATIVE. IT’S ABOUT CREATING SPACES THAT ARE BETTER FOR THEM. AND Formerly THEY’RE OUT, TAKING THAT RISK, AND THEN UNDERSTANDING WHAT YOU’RE DOING, THEN THEY CAN EMBRACE IT. ONE OF THESE THINGS ABOUT ARCHITECTURE, YOU CAN CHANGE YOUR ENVIRONMENT AND CHANGE BEHAVIOR.

    I Envision THE WORK WE’RE PRODUCING NOW, THE WORK WE’LL PRODUCE IN THE FUTURE, IT’S GOING TO AFFECT THE CULTURE OF THE WORKPLACE IN TERMS OF THE INHABITANT. I HAVE NO QUESTION THAT IT’S PART OF A THINNING DOWN OF THIS COUNTRY, WHICH HAS TO TAKE PLACE. WE’VE GOT PEOPLE THAT EAT TOO MUCH — ENERGY, IN THIS CASE — AND THEY HAVE TO BE RETRAINED. AND THEY HAVE TO UNDERSTAND THAT IT’S IMPORTANT, AND THEY DO UNDERSTAND, REALLY, I Envision — RIGHT? AND IT’S IMPORTANT GLOBALLY, IN TERMS OF HOW WE BEHAVE IN A GLOBAL CULTURE, IN OUR ROLE IN THAT GLOBAL CULTURE.

    AT THAT LEVEL, IT MAKES THE PROJECT MOST INTERESTING BECAUSE NOW, WE’RE MOVING FROM ARCHITECTURE TO HUGE MACRO IDEAS AND WE’RE STARTING TO UNDERSTAND THE IMPORTANCE OF A SINGLE BUILDING. AND AS THAT BUILDING ACCRETES TO MAKE LARGER THINGS LIKE CITIES, AND THEN THAT TURNS INTO A CULTURE OF A COUNTRY OR ET CETERA, IT CONNECTS NOW TO HUGE, HUGE ISSUES THAT ARE GLOBAL. FOR MORE Datum ABOUT E-SQUARED , VISIT OUR WEBSITE AT PBS.ORG . E-SQUARED IS AVAILABLE ON DVD . TO ORDER, CALL PBS HOME VIDEO AT 1-800-PLAY-PBS .

    As found on Youtube

    ( MUSIC, HAMMERING .) >> DR CHURCHILL: Currently we’re in the disused Myer building in Fremantle. Last-place week there was nothing here — “its been” derelict. This week, the Interior Architecture and Architecture students from Curtin University have moved in with the most appropriate task and established this amazing exhibition.( MUSIC) >> DR NEILLE: This is their given an opportunity to applied that nonsense on the wall up an open forum and display their reasoning, their ability, their detections.( MUSIC) >> LAUREN: It feels like quite an accomplishment actually.

    It’s really nice to have the opportunity to appearance something that we’ve worked on so difficult. >> CAMDEN: You’re creating this really great task and you’ve got to show it off, to not only in the future content your buyer, because it’s not just for yourself and it’s not just like an essay, it’s really for a lot of people to verify. >> JADE: It’s such an achievement to have gotten this far. It’s a the highest ferocity direction, um, it’s a personal accomplishment that I definitely won’t forget. >> BRETT: It’s good to get that the information received from the public, whether they like it or not. And I guess that’s the measure of good building.( MUSIC) >> LAUREN: I’ve got a panelling structure over in the corner there. It’s a screen that sits in front of a leave or disused room. And it opens and shuts for responding to the consumer, so it’s robotic. The abstraction came from a conjecture called third room, which looks at realized room which is the room we touch and treated with every day.

    And conceive room which is the room of anticipate. And the idea of a third room in between those two, that is a superory standing, or some sort of strange concerning the relationship between the two of them. >> KATRINA: I’m trying to see how a spacial interior could elicit a sublime suffer. The impression is that you’re supposed to just forget your inhibitions and only feel the landscape and take off your shoes. Absolutely go into it. It’s darkness and there’s pebbles around. A few open walls. I’m pretty excited to examine what it’s going to wreak. Assure how they were react to my room. >> JESSICA: You know when you’re in the industry for a while you tend to get a bit, I conclude sometimes things can get a bit stale or you get bogged down in the real life issues such as funds, and you know, clients.

    But when you’re, patently looking around you can see that the students don’t have those various kinds of stress and they’re really free in their thinking and the style we are really approach blueprint is really different. >> BRETT: I believe that the work should be understood by the broader populace. I don’t think it should just be academic or theoretical. >> CAMDEN: If you’re going to create a room for someone to explore and to employ and create an experience in, you need to have that suffer as well to generate that. So, you find yourself actually immersed in what you’re doing and what you’re testing. >> JADE: The style that it opened me up to my creativity.

    I didn’t realise that I had certain skills before I started. I didn’t realise that I could depict, I didn’t realized that I could articulate my suggestions. >> KELISE: The style that you understand the world, it’s changed once you’ve various kinds of spend five years or six years, kind of developing preference and understand better the constructed situation and everything around you and why it is the way it is. >> JESSICA: My outlook and the style that I react to the well-developed situation — that’s completely changed. I can’t step down a street and not be examining in the air!( chortles) >> JADE: Always being able to experiment something, and experiment it, and pushing further.

    And never only kind of be comfortable with the first idea. >> JESSICA: I actually think there’s a number of wizards in the room tonight. >> DR NEILLE: It’s really not about the ordinary, it’s about trying to oblige something special for everyone. >> JESSICA: I’ve come out knowing enough of certain things to interject them into my blueprint. And make sure that they’re workable and understandable and the government had the possibility to be built. >> CAMDEN: I feel like I’ve got enough within myself to contribute to the field.

    >> KATRINA: Yeah, I’m hoping for large-scale happenings, yeah.( MUSIC ).

    Architectural services

     

    For a very long time, we have believed that the hand of an architect should look like this. It is known that architects are smart and sophisticated. They ever wear black, and they know better than anyone else how our metropolitans has been in operation. They build modelings, and they look at them from above. An architect’s hand is like the hand of God. This particular hand belongs to Le Corbusier, and in this iconic photo, he is presenting a model of Plan Voisin, a utopian modernist vision for Paris that fortunately was never built, but the impact of his ideas was enormous. In reality, urban planners today are trying to fix what this person, with his hands from above, did to metropolitans. Modernist city planning produced rooms specially designed for cars, a city where different functions like stores, bureaux and dwelling, are strictly divided; a city where the traditional street, together with all street life, is stimulated obsolete.

    Contrary to Le Corbusier, I deeply care about streets, and I wish that the street of our metropolitans offered a more balanced room for mobility and for social life. I likewise believe that the hand of an architect can look like this, and he, or she, can be working inside of the model, immediately on wall street. For the past five years, I’ve had the opportunity to work in several urban design programmes in public rooms. I’ve employed my own hands to build these things. I’ve expended many hours on the website, and, while there, I’ve stimulated some interesting observations. It all started with a project in Bastejkalns Park in Riga, that’s when I expended a week crawling on the floor, painting light-green circles, and constantly clarifying to curious passers-by why I am doing this. I was actually setting up an outdoor exhibition which was dedicated to a Latvian columnist. My experiments with coloring resumed in Sarkandaugava neighbourhood in Riga, and this time I painted everything cherry-red, and, of course, I carried on please explain why. It was to differentiate the first public square in Riga, co-designed with a brave neighbourhood community. But today, I’d like to tell you more about the project in Miera Street.

    The call of wall street intends’ serenity’ in Latvian, and the call of the project “Mierigi” carries as’ peacefully’ or’ easily ‘. At our studio, Fine Young Urbanists, all my fellow members Toms Kokins and I started working with Miera Street 3 years ago. Now, this was when I had just returned from Rotterdam, the Netherlands, where I had expended several years learning and working. When the time comes to street designing, the Netherlands is genuinely a superpower. There are so many different kinds of streets in the Dutch metropolitans: with beautiful large-hearted trees, with canals, with wide sidewalks – and I know you’re probably belief this already – with cycling paths, of course. Living in Rotterdam stimulated me recognise that healthy lifestyles and vibrant street life can be incorporated within urban design. Without even thinking of practice, I rode my bicycle for at least 20 times every day. Without even looking for a park, I had access to greenery right there on wall street. I assured people barbecuing, watching Tv, or selling their furniture on wall street, and I gladly took part in that.

    I felt that I had the freedom to move around the city whichever way I liked, I was fit, and I was happy. And then I returned to Riga. I assured the street here from a new perspective: how sad they genuinely are, how empty, specially the ones that have been constructed recently. Cycling experienced uncomfortable, and quite soon I switched to a car because it’s so easy. Riga today recurs the same mistakes that American metropolitans stimulated back in the 1950 s: it constructs freeways to solve traffic problems, it allows large-hearted shopping centers to pop up next to these freeways, and for suburban villages to grow just outside the borders of Riga. At the same time, the historical center is rapidly loosing residents, the breath excellence is the worst in the Baltic Country due to traffic congestion, and there is an empty structure on almost every block.

    Riga stimulated me, an urban planner, feel limited in my selects and unconsciously switch to a lifestyle that induces me unfit and unhappy. With all this in brain, we chose we are to be able do something about at least one street in Riga. The reasons set out above we decide to Miera Street was that there was an active neighbourhood community which is quite exceptional for a street in the center of Riga, there was a great spatial potential for a high-quality street life, and there was a very obvious trouble: 90% of the cars go on tram-rails leaving the paths designed for them empty. At the same time, pedestrians and the increasing number of cyclists have to share a narrow sidewalk and navigate between signposts, open door, and parked cars. We were sure that the available street room can be used in a more balanced path. By generate a shared car and tram lane in the middle, room would free up for a cycling lane on each side of the street.

    That would in turn allow us to vacate the side strolls for walking, for sitting, for bicycle parking, for outdoor coffeehouse, for plants and for trees, for beautiful, light-green, leafy trees. Did you know that in those nearly 700 meters of Miera Street that are considered to be a hip, creative quarter, there are only 15 trees? That is one tree for 45 meters, on only one back of wall street. That doesn’t seem so hip, does it? With a better designed street profile, it would become easier and safer for pedestrians to cross the street, small business would have better spatial circumstances to develop, and there would still be car parking available where needed, the livability of Miera Street aimed at improving, and all this would in fact leave the current traffic situation practically intact.

    People is as simple as feel better, more at home on a street that accommodates more choices. What we also wanted to explore with this project was the ties between an architect and these communities. The locals are surely experts of their street, and we, urban planners, want to know what they know because we want to create a designing that are appropriate the needs and requirements and actually improves their street. So at first we stimulated these pulls and photo-montages to have something to talk about. Then we tried involving people on wall street by showing them our visions. The answer was primarily positive, but we still weren’t really sure if the proposed answer was the best fit or if we were even understood. So eventually, we chose to test the idea spatially, and we did what architects commonly do: we built a model. But instead of structure something tiny and looking at it from above, we decided that we would become those tiny plastic people inside of the model and test the idea in real circumstances on a scale one to one, immediately on the street.

    The mock-up established in three days, and it remained in place for almost a week. It changed wall street instantly. On one back, we added merely 30 centimeters to the sidewalk, and that was enough to create room for terraces and tiny cafe tables next to the wall; which is very convenient if you crave to sit down and wait for somebody, have a dinner, reorganize your suitcases after grocery browse, remainder after a long go, or simply enjoy sitting down and looking at other people. On the other side, as soon as we put down tables and chairs, people from a nearby coffeehouse started serving coffee and cakes. People instinctively know how to use a good street when they see it. We at Fine Young Urbanists belief these sorts of urban prototyping with mock-ups is the cheapest, fastest and most reliable path for experimenting changes in the urban settings. Urban prototyping is collective envisage, collective wishful thinking. It allows you to feel the room with your body to see if you can find a comfortable home for yourself, if you want to stay there. It is also a path to eschew expensive designing blunders later.

    We have learned that these small actions in a public room is a great way to involve the public in designing process. During construction time, we were constantly there: structure, painting and talking about here people that were interested in this. The most frequently asked query was, “Why is this thing blue? ” Well, the vivid coloring provoked people to start a discussion with strangers about street designing; that are actually the daydream of an urban planner come true. And this time we got all kinds of questions: from extremely positive, very supportive to instead critical, and even aggressive.

    It is comprehensible that not everyone corroborates the notion of more cyclists on the street, it is a nuisance. Not everybody wants to give up their parking space for an outdoor coffeehouse or potted flowers. But here I would like to refer back to a smart advice that my mother formerly shared with me: “No we are capable of withstand good manners. People are entitled to have an opinion that is different from yours, but be polite, talk calmly, and listen to what others have to say. Perhaps you’ll learn something, and perhaps they will start listening to you.” As urbanites, we must understand that cycling paths are not built merely to delight cyclists, and street furniture is not installed for the profit of shopkeepers, and streets in general do not subsist merely for the convenience of cars. Envisioning that would be like still expressed his belief that telephones are only stimulated for calling. Metropolis are not that simple-minded. Metropolis are very complex creatures where everything needs to be in equilibrium and where everyone – young, healthy and financially procure, as well as those whose income is modest and whose movements are limited – can equally take part in mobility and in social life.

    Why do I see that streets are so important? The American urbanist and famous people watcher William H. Whyte formerly beautifully used to say streets are the rivers of life in the city. Of course, streets help us effectively move around, but streets are also a stage where public life can take place. And public life really is the essence of metropolitans. People have not built urban agreements to persist concealed from each other in their homes or in their cars.

    They have come together to exchange knowledge, to share assets, and to develop something collectively, and the very best metropoli has a capability to embrace all the various selects of the person or persons that lives there and to help balance them spatially. After finishing the “Mierigi” project, a video was stimulated, and we posted it online. The idea resonated with people worldwide. Our little video has now been viewed, tweeted, shared, liked over 60 000 times.

    That can show that urban planners, activists, and community leaders all over the world “re even looking for” new ways to let their metropolitans know that there is a desire to take street room back from cars and profit-hungry developers. And we are definitely not alone: there is a whole new engender of architects and urban planners that are less related with designing iconic buildings and more very interested in humanizing the rigid, unbalanced metropoli. They are not “afraid youre going to” take risks, working in cooperation with their own hands, and “they il be” masters in detecting loopholes in regulations and alternative ways of communication. Forget about the arrogant modernist. This new architect is more of a hacker. Practices like Exist in France, or Raumlabor in Germany, or Assemble in the UK, are successfully transforming the responsibilities of architects and changing the path we seem at congested streets, empty buildings, and undesired areas in our metropolitans. For example, Parkind Day started as a small initiative of Rebar Art and Design Studio in San Francisco, and in 10 years, it has grown into a global motion, and several metropolitans have even incorporated it into their urban plans. Or the architectural firm ZUS in Rotterdam managed to transform an undesired role pulley-block that had stood empty for 15 times into a creative hotspot and a testing website for new ideas.

    That is a place now that many other metropolitans are envious of. How could we persuasion even more architects and urban planners to become actively involved in metropoli construct? I see one of the ways is through education. Every year, we plan a summertime academy for students and young professionals of architecture, urban development and designing. And in this summer academy, they get a chance to go through a full designing cycle in only 2 week. This is something rare in architectural education. The players do research, come up with a conception, and experiment it immediately by building it in a public domain.

    Through this, they learn how heavy real substances are and how frightening power tools can sometimes be. And they don’t only build for the sake of practice; they create something that the neighbourhood borough – in our case, Cesis – or a neighbourhood organisation is genuinely very interested in. Ultimately, at the end of the summer academy, they envision the finished building being appropriated by the public. They see whether it runs as intended or it fails to live up to the concept. This hand-on experience wholly changes the path these young architects view their profession. In our summertime academy, we teach that architecture reaches beyond buildings and that urbanism is not just the room between them. We believe that building is a social act, but let’s not forget that prototypes are just a stair towards making real public rooms, and a summertime academy will probably never supplant a university. I don’t really think that Miera Street should be painted all blue, and I know that professional builders have much more skill operating a screw handgun than architects ever will. What I am suggesting is that to keep a clear and critical brain we often require a change of perspective.

    To build better metropolitans, we need both: a thorough to better understand street life and a position from above. I believe that taking small steps can lead to major conversions in our metropolitans. And I genuinely, genuinely hope that in the future there will be more architects and urban designers that rely less on Mega Lo Mania visions and more on their humanity. Thank you.( Applause ).

    As found on Youtube

    Let’s go way back! Look back and reminisce on how it began And how I became the designer that I am I knew I was an architect since the age of two, Standing in my cot I had a mesmerizing view. Going in my stroller the batches were astounding Everywhere I gazed was stone, brick, and glazing My second word form, first message role My mothers were amazed i could connect that conjugation Lookin like a zebra, yeah I’m wearin grey and pitch-black, Too busy building organizations ain’t got no time to nap. We’re architects oh! and we knew it from the start A perfect compounding of house and artistry We’ve been making, since the age of two And now we’re intent, a better metropoli, for you My abilities blossomed, at the age of six Sagging instant motifs with getaway protrudes Announce me Abraham, I had skill with the Lincoln Logs, Designed a mini-house, for my dog. I was a boss at Jenga, schooling all your best friend, Check out my desk, my enormous potpourrus of writes, Attracted my first all nighter by the age of nine With Legos I constructed an immaculate pattern We’re architects oh! and we knew it from the start A perfect compounding of house and artistry, yeah We’ve been making, since the age of two And now we’re intent, a better metropoli, for you Construct a doll room, out of sud core timber For my Architect Barbie, she was floored! Skipped a family trip to disappear appreciate Mickey Mouse, Rather go to Falling Water to see Franks famous house.

    Donned a outlining tubing, instead of a journal container It was the start of my architect swag Sorted all my clothes, according to hues And made a sketch up of my bedroom with a 3d view We’re designers, and we knew it from the start A perfect compounding of house and artistry We’ve been making, since the age of two And now we’re intent, a better metropoli, for you Structuring skylines within Sim City And in Minecraft I constructed a dwelling that was pretty Designed a treehouse, and to be submitted to enjoyment But I had to cut costs, to save for my tuition Mowed a hundred lawns to buy a 3d printer And took up woodworking, ow! A splinter! Love to design and improve, it’s what I do.

    I’m gonna be an architect, how about you? So get up! Grab your pencils, let’s pattern the city Inspire the world, as we make it pretty We are creators! As you are able to derive Come join us! and DISCOVER ARCHITECTURE.

    As found on Youtube

    hqdefault - I am an Architect - thoughts part 1

    Yo! Where my red strands at? I paint Frank Lloyd Wright, while you think I’m Mike Brady And operators down our run and call us crazy We get rounded specs, but they ain’t for looks It’s from staring at our screens and all those history of the world We alter an empty space, into a world of alternative Maintaining privacy, and tranquility Graduate from school, get changed the world, But I’m stuck designing thrones with a clockwise twirl We’re architects oh! With creative flair Re-designing the world, from structures to chairs It’s a daily grind, but we desire what we do A fulfilling job giving you a better opinion Lord of the Elmer’s, and emperor of scraps Building modelings our of paper, and bottle caps I’m a master of BIM, drawing strands with sprints, Except I’ll lose my mind, if Revit clangs GREEN is amber, and LEED is big, Know the golden triangle, and discover your trig Challenge the formula, push the envelope, Threw more glazing over here.

    That is totally drugs! We’re architects oh! With creative flair Re-designing the world, from structures to chairs It’s a daily grind, but we desire what we do A fulfilling job giving you a better opinion Crank the A/ C in the agency merely to stay awake, Espresso and Red Bull till I get a stomach ache With our cotton blazers high, we have a sense of style, But to the rest of the world we are only detail and smile I read code books, while I’m on vacation Take pictures of, my recent invention We wear black and grey-haired, with no logos on our yarns So numerous sleepless nights we’re like the marching dead We’re architects oh! With creative flair Re-designing the world, from structures to chairs It’s a daily grind, but we desire what we do A fulfilling job giving you a better opinion Got so many magnitudes, myswell( might as well) call me a fish Does your lawn appear carrying? I’ll design you a dish Starchitects , no !, call them Hollywood performers, Cause they can’t deal with general contractors Spec book wasn’t clear so I got these RFI’s Patrons drawing changes that we all despise.

    We get better FORM, than Jordan’s jump shot And designs that role like a million dollar yacht. We’re architects oh! With creative flair Re-designing the world, from structures to chairs It’s a daily grind, but we desire what we do A fulfilling job giving you a better opinion I’m an architect, “Oh you entail like Ted Mosby? “.

    As found on Youtube